Vomiting Blood (Hematemesis)



No matter the circumstances, vomiting is always an unpleasant experience. Add to that the fact that it often occurs in conjunction with other symptoms of illness — such as fatigue, fever, chills, or an upset stomach — and it’s enough to make the ordeal miserable. But, if in addition to the regular discomforts that usually come with vomiting, you notice you also regurgitated blood, you likely feel concerned about what it means. What’s going on with your health? What causes a person to vomit blood? And, when should you go to the ER?

What is hematemesis?

The medical term for vomiting blood is hematemesis. It’s a serious condition, as it often signifies that the person is bleeding internally. Signs that this is precisely what you’re experiencing include bright red blood in your vomit, brown or black vomit, vomiting items with the look and consistency of coffee grounds, and/or bowel movements that have blood in them or look like tar. Small streaks or flecks of blood are not usually considered to be hematemesis.

Causes of Hematemesis

Hematemesis can be caused by a lot of different internal injuries. In more serious cases, it could be an indication of cirrhosis, or esophageal or pancreatic cancer. Some of the most common include:

  • Gastroenteritis
  • Gastritis
  • Pancreatitis
  • Hepatitis
  • H. pylori
  • Bleeding stomach ulcers
  • Bleeding intestinal varices
  • Tumors in the stomach or esophagus
  • Using blood thinners
  • Hemorrhagic fever
  • Violent retching that causes tears in the stomach or esophagus
  • Organ rupture

If the person vomiting blood is a child, it could be due to a congenital abnormality, milk allergy, blood clotting disorders, vitamin K deficiency, or swallowing an object. If the person vomiting consumes excessive amounts of alcohol, the blood may be a sign of cirrhosis or burst blood vessels in the liver.

When to Go to the ER if You’re Vomiting Blood

In rare instances, vomiting blood may be caused by something relatively minor — such as a nose bleed or swallowing blood from a mouth injury. However, if none of these apply to you, vomiting blood is an emergency. Seek medical attention immediately. Tell your doctor when you started vomiting blood, the amount of blood vomited, and whether it was bright red or black. Mention every single recent illness you’ve had or if you have any chronic medical conditions — as well as the medications you’re taking to treat them.

If you’re experiencing signs of too much blood loss — such as dizziness, rapid breathing, pale and cool skin, a fast pulse, and/or weakness, call 911 immediately. Failing to do so may put your health and life at risk.

24-Hour Emergency Room Services in Colorado Springs and Texas

If you’re vomiting blood, we can provide you with the care you need. If you have questions or need immediate treatment, your nearest Complete Care location is ready to help, no matter the time of day or night. We offer a variety of services to help you and your family in your time of need. No appointments are necessary.

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Vomiting Blood (Hematemesis) – Complete Care

Vomiting Blood (Hematemesis)No matter the circumstances, vomiting is always an unpleasant experience. Add to that the fact that it often occurs in conjunction with other symptoms of illness — such as fatigue, fever, chills, or an upset stomach — and it’s enough to make the ordeal miserable. But, if in addition to the regular discomforts that usually come with vomiting, you notice you also regurgitated blood, you likely feel concerned about what it means. What’s going on with your health? What causes a person to vomit blood? And, when should you go to the ER?What is hematemesis?The medical term for vomiting blood is hematemesis. It’s a serious condition, as it often signifies that the person is bleeding internally. Signs that this is precisely what you’re experiencing include bright red blood in your vomit, brown or black vomit, vomiting items with the look and consistency of coffee grounds, and/or bowel movements that have blood in them or look like tar. Small streaks or flecks of blood are not usually considered to be hematemesis.Causes of HematemesisHematemesis can be caused by a lot of different internal injuries. In more serious cases, it could be an indication of cirrhosis, or esophageal or pancreatic cancer. Some of the most common include:GastroenteritisGastritisPancreatitisHepatitisH. pyloriBleeding stomach ulcersBleeding intestinal varicesTumors in the stomach or esophagusUsing blood thinnersHemorrhagic feverViolent retching that causes tears in the stomach or esophagusOrgan ruptureIf the person vomiting blood is a child, it could be due to a congenital abnormality, milk allergy, blood clotting disorders, vitamin K deficiency, or swallowing an object. If the person vomiting consumes excessive amounts of alcohol, the blood may be a sign of cirrhosis or burst blood vessels in the liver.When to Go to the ER if You’re Vomiting BloodIn rare instances, vomiting blood may be caused by something relatively minor — such as a nose bleed or swallowing blood from a mouth injury. However, if none of these apply to you, vomiting blood is an emergency. Seek medical attention immediately. Tell your doctor when you started vomiting blood, the amount of blood vomited, and whether it was bright red or black. Mention every single recent illness you’ve had or if you have any chronic medical conditions — as well as the medications you’re taking to treat them.If you’re experiencing signs of too much blood loss — such as dizziness, rapid breathing, pale and cool skin, a fast pulse, and/or weakness, call 911 immediately. Failing to do so may put your health and life at risk.24-Hour Emergency Room Services in Colorado Springs and TexasIf you’re vomiting blood, we can provide you with the care you need. If you have questions or need immediate treatment, your nearest Complete Care location is ready to help, no matter the time of day or night. We offer a variety of services to help you and your family in your time of need. No appointments are necessary.Find the Complete Care location nearest you.

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Vomiting Blood (Haematemesis) | Causes, Help and Treatment

Vomiting Blood (Haematemesis) | Causes, Help and TreatmentYou should call an ambulance or go directly to the nearest emergency department if you bring up (vomit) blood. Often the bleeding will stop quite quickly but in some cases it can become severe and life-threatening. So always play safe and seek medical help quickly. There is a range of different causes – discussed below. Many causes can be treated but the first priority is to make sure the bleeding stops. The rest of this leaflet aims to give some background information but is not a substitute for obtaining immediate medical attention if you vomit blood.What is vomiting blood (haematemesis)?The medical word for vomiting blood (or throwing up blood) is haematemesis. This symptom is usually due to a problem within the upper gut. That is, the gullet (oesophagus), stomach or the first part of the gut (small intestine) known as the duodenum. There is a range of different causes – discussed below.Vomiting of blood is a medical emergency. In many cases the bleeding will stop quite quickly but in some cases it can become severe and life-threatening. Therefore, call an ambulance or go directly to the nearest emergency department if you vomit blood.Understanding the upper gutYour gut (gastrointestinal tract) is the tube that starts at your mouth, and ends at your bottom (anus).The upper gut includes the gullet (oesophagus), stomach and first part of the gut (small intestine) known as the duodenum. Food passes down the gullet into the stomach. The stomach makes acid which is not essential but helps to digest food. After being mixed in the stomach, food passes into the duodenum, to be digested.Some types of bleeding from the upper gutThe type of bleeding is sometimes described as follows:Dark blood. This is often referred to as a ‘coffee ground’ colour. This suggests that the bleed has been relatively slow. The blood has been in contact with stomach acid long enough for the acid to turn the blood a dark brown/red colour. The bleeding in this situation may not yet have been heavy. However, it may become heavy at a later time.A large amount of bright red blood suggests a rapid and large bleed.Melaena is the medical word for old, dark blood in stools (faeces). If you have melaena, your stools become very dark or black. There is often a tar-like consistency. Vomiting blood and having melaena are symptoms that often go together. Having both symptoms together means that you have had a lot of bleeding into the gut.Other symptoms may occur at the same time as vomiting blood. For example, tummy (abdominal) pain, high temperature (fever), feeling unwell, or other gut symptoms. If you lose a lot of blood, it can make you feel dizzy or even pass out. The presence and type of other symptoms may help to point to a cause of the bleeding. Sometimes there are no other symptoms at first.What are the causes of vomiting blood?Common causes of throwing up blood include:A stomach ulcer.Alcoholic liver disease.A tear in your gullet (oesophagus) caused by prolonged retching.Swallowing blood from a nosebleed.Vomiting blood always needs to be checked out by a doctor and may need emergency treatment in hospital.Bleeding from the oesophagusCauses include:Oesophageal varices. Varices are enlarged, swollen blood vessels in the lining of the gullet or stomach. They are one of the possible complications of liver cirrhosis. In cirrhosis, scarred liver tissue blocks blood flow through the liver. This causes an increase in pressure in the vein that takes blood from the gut to the liver (the portal vein). The increased pressure pushes back into the gut and causes the veins to swell in the gullet….

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When to Use The ER? Coughing or Vomiting Blood | BellaireER

When to Use The ER? Coughing or Vomiting Blood | BellaireER | BellaireERWhen to Use The ER? Coughing or Vomiting BloodCoughing or vomiting blood is a serious indication of an underlying medical condition, which could be fatal. For this reason, it is advisable to call for an ambulance or visit the ER after coughing or vomiting blood. However, it is also essential to know some of the medical conditions that may cause vomiting or cough blood. If you notice any of the signs below, contact Bellaire ER immediately for emergency medical care.What does Blood in Vomit Look like?Vomiting blood is a medical condition known as haematemesis and may occur due to internal bleeding from the gut. The following colors of blood show different meanings: • Dark Blood: The color looks like ground coffee and means that the bleeding is relatively slow • Bright Red Blood: Suggests that bleeding is rapid and largeWhat causes vomiting Blood?Vomiting blood may occur due to bleeding from one of the following organs in your gut. 1. Bleeding from the Oesophagus which can occur due to one of the following conditions: Oesophageal varices: These are enlarged swollen blood vessels in the gut or stomach, that are often a complication of liver cirrhosis. Inflammation of the oesophagus (oesophagitis) Oesophageal cancer Mallory Weiss Syndrome2. Bleeding from the Stomach could occur due to: Stomach ulcer Infection with a bacteria called Helicobacter pylori Anti-inflammatory medicine Stress Stomach cancer Gastritis Aspirin Varices Mallory-Weiss Syndrome3. Bleeding from the Duodenum: Duodenal Ulcer Duodenitis: Inflammation of the duodenal lining4. Bleeding that is not from the gut Sometimes, it is possible to swallow blood after a nosebleed, and then vomit it. In this case, the doctor will assess before ordering treatment.5. Rare causes form any part of the Upper Gut Radiation Poisoning Uncommon infections of the gut InjuryWhat Tests Should You Expect?Doctor assessment: The doctor will try and assess the source and cause of the blood in your vomit Blood tests: To find out how much blood you have lost and if you need intravenous fluids. The tests are also used to determine the functionality of your liver. Gastroscopy: An internal examination of the gut.What is the Treatment for Vomiting Blood?Initial Treatment: If bleeding is severe, blood transfusion or a drip into the vein may be required to compensate for lost blood. Instruments that can be passed down the endoscope Emergency surgery and other treatmentsSymptoms That Accompany Vomiting BloodDizziness or fainting Confusion and forgetfulness Skin that looks clammy and pale Rapid heart rate and anxiety or agitation Enlarged Pupils Blurred vision Nausea Weakness Rapid Shallow Breathing Reduced urine productionCoughing BloodCoughing up blood is a medical condition also known as hemoptysis. The blood may be bright red or may occur in phlegmWhat are some of the causes?Bronchitis Bronchiectasis Lung Cancer Benign tumors Blood Thinners Pneumonia Pulmonary Embolism Pulmonary Edema Congestive heart failure Tuberculosis Inflammatory or autoimmune conditions (lupus, Wegener’s granulomatosis, microscopic polyangiitis, and many others) Trauma (e.g., from a gunshot wound) Pulmonary arteriovenous malformations Cocaine Taking anticoagulants such as warfarin, rivaroxaban, dabigatran Excessive smoking Heavy coughing High AltitudesWhat Tests Should You Expect?History and Physical Examination: The doctor will try and find the source of blood and also identify if it is coming from the lungs and the trachea. Chest X-ray: To show areas where bleeding could be occurring before treatment is administered. CT Scan: provide a better image of the chest for more analysis Bronchoscopy: The doctor inserts an endoscope through the nose or mouth into the windpipe to find the source of bleeding Coagulation tests: To find out if blood clotting is functioning normally Arterial Blood gas: To find the oxygen level in the blood Blood Chemistry Profile: A test to measure the electrolytes and kidney function Urinalysis Pulse oximetryWhat Are Some of the Treatments That May Be Administered?Bronchial Artery Embolization: the bleeding artery is blocked, and other arteries compensate for it. Bronchoscopy Surgery: This is required in severe conditions where a lung needs to be removed. Antibiotics for pneumonia and tuberculosis Chemotherapy/radiation for lung cancer Steroids for inflammatory conditionsWhat Should You Do If You Cough Up or Vomit Blood?Once you start coughing or vomiting blood that…

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Vomiting blood – NHS

Vomiting blood Vomiting blood (called haematemesis) needs to be checked. It often needs emergency treatment.Vomit can vary from bright red to brown or black. It may be like liquid or more solid, or look like coffee granules. Causes of vomiting blood There are many possible causes of vomiting blood.It’s often a sign of bleeding somewhere in your food pipe (oesophagus), which runs from your mouth to your stomach.Common causes of vomiting blood include:gastritisstomach ulcersheart burn and acid refluxalcohol-related liver diseasedamage to your food pipe from being sick or coughing a lotLess common causes include:oesophageal cancer or stomach cancerblood conditions, such as haemophiliasome medicines, including aspirin, anti-inflammatory painkillers such as ibuprofen and anticoagulant medicines (blood thinning medicines)poisoningIt’s also possible to vomit blood that was swallowed. For example, from a nosebleed or a baby breastfeeding on a bleeding nipple. Immediate action required: Call 999 or go to A&E if: You or your child are vomiting blood (or have vomited blood) and:feel generally unwellfeel confusedfeel faint or dizzyhave rapid or shallow breathinghave cold, clammy, pale skinhave tummy painhave black poo Find your nearest A&E Information: If you have stopped vomiting blood and had no other symptoms, ask for an urgent GP appointment, call 111 or get help from 111 online. Page last reviewed: 05 April 2022 Next review due: 05 April 2025

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Throwing Up Blood | FastMed Urgent Care

Throwing Up Blood | FastMed Urgent Care Vomiting is an unpleasant experience for everyone. The truth is, though, that it serves a purpose for your health and well-being. Vomiting is our body’s way of getting rid of anything toxic we may ingest. Vomiting can be caused by many things, from the stomach flu to pregnancy. It is important to recognize when throwing up requires immediate medical attention (e.g. throwing up blood) or when you can simply wait it out at home (e.g. the stomach flu). FastMed Urgent Care provides medical treatment when you have symptoms such as vomiting.   Vomiting: Should You Visit FastMed or the Emergency Room? If you’re throwing up, deciding whether or not to go to the doctor can be difficult. It isn’t always easy to tell what is causing you to vomit. There are different conditions that can cause vomiting, and they range from minor to very severe. Vomiting can be a symptom of illnesses like food poisoning, motion sickness, gallbladder disease, or even cancer. Some causes of vomiting require immediate attention, and some do not. Here are reasons why you should visit the emergency room: You are throwing up blood (blood can be bright red or have the appearance of coffee grounds) Severe headache or stiff neck Lethargy, confusion, or decreased alertness Severe abdominal pain Fever over 101 degrees Diarrhea Rapid breathing or pulse Since it can be quite alarming, we should address one issue. Don’t initially panic should you find yourself throwing up blood. Small traces of blood in your vomit can be caused by something as simple as bleeding gums. You will still want to visit the emergency room, but it is important, as well as in any of these cases, to remain calm. Visit FastMed Urgent Care for the following reasons: Your vomiting lasts more than a few days Signs of dehydration are present A known head injury has occurred FastMed offers an affordable alternative to the emergency room for non-life-threatening conditions. We are open extended hours during the week, and have hours on weekends and holidays. Visit a FastMed clinic near you to be seen for your symptoms today. Sign up for email offers Sign up to receive coupons, health tips, and more–directly to your inbox. Our Brands

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Vomiting Blood (Hematemesis): Causes, Symptoms & Treatment

Why Am I Vomiting Blood?Vomiting blood (hematemesis) is the regurgitation of stomach contents mixed with blood, or the regurgitation of blood only. Blood in vomit generally comes from an upper gastrointestinal (GI) source, such as your stomach.In some cases, minor causes may trigger vomiting blood, such as swallowing blood from a mouth injury or a nosebleed. These situations will likely not cause any long-term harm. Vomiting blood may also be caused by more serious conditions that can be a medical emergency, such as: internal injuriesorgan bleedingorgan ruptureThe color of vomited blood may help indicate to your doctor the source and severity of the bleeding. Regurgitated blood may appear: bright redas red streaks mixed with foodbrown, which often resembles coffee groundsBright red blood often indicates an acute bleeding episode in your esophagus or stomach. It may represent a fast-bleeding source. Darker-colored blood means the blood has been in your GI tract for a few hours. It usually represents a slower and steadier source of bleeding.If possible, take a picture of the vomit with blood to show your doctor. Call your doctor immediately or go to the ER right away if you vomit any amount of blood, especially if it follows an injury. Blood in vomit can be due to any number of causes, from mild to life threatening. It can be difficult to tell the source of the bleeding without a medical exam.Vomiting blood caused by excessive bleeding can cause shock due to internal GI bleeding. Common symptoms of shock include:fast, shallow breathingrapid heartbeatlow urine outputpale skincold or clammy skinconfusionfaintingdizziness upon standingblurred visionIf not treated immediately, shock can lead to irreversible organ dysfunction, multi-organ failure, and death. If you experience any symptoms of shock, have someone take you to the ER or call 911.To diagnose the cause for blood in your vomit, your doctor will begin by asking questions about your symptoms and whether or not you were recently injured.Your doctor will likely perform an upper endoscopy to look inside your GI tract while you’re sedated.They will place a small, flexible tube called an endoscope into your mouth and down into your stomach and small intestine. A fiber optic camera in the tube allows your doctor to see the contents of your stomach and examine you internally for any sources of bleeding.Your doctor may also order a blood test to check your complete blood count. This helps to assess the amount of blood lost. If your doctor suspects bleeding is due to another condition such as cancer, they may order imaging tests to look inside your body. These scans reveal atypical characteristics in your body, such as ruptured organs or atypical growths, and may include:CT scansultrasoundsX-raysMRI scanspositron emission tomography (PET) scansYour doctor my perform a biopsy of suspicious tissue as well as other tests based on the condition they suspect may be causing you to vomit blood.Depending on the cause, vomiting blood may cause additional health complications. Anemia is one complication of excessive bleeding. It’s a deficiency of healthy red blood cells. It occurs particularly when…

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Hematemesis (Vomiting Blood): Causes, What it Is & Treatment

Hematemesis (Vomiting Blood): Causes, What it Is & Treatment Overview What is hematemesis? Hematemesis means vomiting blood. You may vomit blood along with your stomach contents, or blood alone. It may be fresh and bright red, or older, darker and coagulated, like coffee grounds. Hematemesis is a sign of internal bleeding from the upper portion of your digestive tract — the esophagus, stomach and first portion of your small intestine called the duodenum. If you’re vomiting blood, you should seek medical attention right away. Is vomiting blood very serious? There are many possible causes of blood in your vomit. Some are very serious. Healthcare providers can’t tell how serious it is until they investigate and diagnose the cause. For this reason, healthcare providers treat all cases of hematemesis as emergencies until they know better, and you should too. Is a little blood in vomit normal? Blood in your vomit is never normal. A small amount may indicate a more benign cause. For example, you might see a small amount of blood in your vomit simply from the trauma of vomiting. But there are many other reasons why hematemesis can occur. It’s important to call your healthcare provider if you’re vomiting blood at all. Can vomiting blood cause death? Vomiting itself is unlikely to cause death, but severe blood loss can. If you’re bleeding a lot, you’re at risk of going into hypovolemic shock, which can cause organ failure and death. Fortunately, this is a rare event. But if you’re vomiting a lot of blood, you should seek treatment right away. You may need treatment beyond just stopping the bleeding. Possible Causes What does it mean if you throw up blood? In general, vomiting blood is a sign of bleeding inside your upper GI tract. Your upper GI includes your esophagus, stomach and duodenum. It’s possible to vomit blood if you swallow it due to a nosebleed or mouth bleed. But if you haven’t swallowed blood, it’s coming from inside your upper digestive system. Bright red blood is fresh and indicates an active bleed, which might be heavier and more urgent. Coffee ground vomit — blood that looks brown and lumpy — is older blood. It may indicate a slower bleed or one that has stopped. It usually takes a significant amount of bleeding to trigger vomiting. What are the possible causes of hematemesis? Conditions that most commonly cause hematemesis include: Bleeding ulcers. A peptic ulcer is an open sore in your stomach or duodenum. It’s often caused by a bacterial infection, or by the regular use of NSAIDs or aspirin. Acute inflammation. Inflammation of your esophagus or stomach lining can cause bleeding from the arteries underneath. Heavy alcohol use, aspirin and NSAIDs, and severe acid reflux are common causes. Enlarged blood vessels that rupture. Portal hypertension, a consequence of cirrhosis, causes increased pressure in your abdominal veins. This can lead to enlargement of the veins in your esophagus and stomach, making them fragile and easy to break. Bleeding from these varices can be extremely serious. Chronic pancreatitis. Long-term pancreatitis can damage the blood vessels surrounding your pancreas, leading to rupture and bleeding. The blood can travel into your duodenum. Other possible causes include: Traumatic injury. A direct, blunt injury to your stomach or esophagus may cause acute bleeding inside. Internal injuries can also rarely occur as a result of medical procedures. Mallory-Weiss syndrome. A Mallory-Weiss tear is a tear in your esophagus caused by violent vomiting. It usually occurs after drinking too much alcohol. Tumors. Both benign and malignant tumors can bleed. A bleeding tumor needs to be tested for cancer of the stomach, the esophagus or the pancreas. Angiodysplasias. These are abnormal surface blood vessels that can cause bleeding from your stomach and intestines. Care and Treatment Can hematemesis be cured? Healthcare providers can stop active internal bleeding in several ways. This will be their first concern when you are vomiting blood. However, if your bleeding is caused by a chronic condition, that might be harder to cure. It’s possible to have recurring hematemesis if the…

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25 Reasons to Visit an Emergency Room for Vomiting Blood

25 Reasons to Visit an Emergency Room for Vomiting Blood 25 Reasons to Visit an Emergency Room for Vomiting Blood Vomiting of blood, also known as hematemesis, is one of the scarier things to consider and one that may be due to a number of reasons and medical conditions. Blood in the vomit can vary as far as amount is concerned from large amounts to only streaks of blood. In any case, blood in the vomit is a medical emergency and should be treated as such with a visit to an emergency room. This article will look to highlight a number of reasons that should lead to one visiting an emergency room for vomiting blood. If the vomiting of blood is accompanied by rapid shallow breathing, then the next course of action should be to head over to an emergency room to be assessed. You should also head over to an emergency room to be checked out if the vomiting of blood is accompanied by dizzy spells. Another reason to visit an emergency room for vomiting blood is if the Vomiting of blood is accompanied by blurred vision. Those that are having episodes of vomiting of blood accompanied by loss of consciousness and fainting should ensure that they also head over to the emergency room as soon as they can. If you are also experiencing some vomiting of blood accompanied by confusion, then you should ensure that you head to an emergency room pronto. As is recommended by the folks over at frontlineer.com, if you are experiencing vomiting of blood accompanied by nausea, then you should also ensure you visit an emergency room. You should also ensure that you rush to the emergency room when you start experiencing vomiting of blood accompanied by pale skin that is cold to the touch. Another reason to visit an emergency room for vomiting blood is if you are experiencing vomiting of blood accompanied by low urine output or production. Those that are experiencing vomiting of blood accompanied by dilated pupils are also advised to head over to the emergency room as soon as possible as this is a clear sign the body is going into shock. If you are experiencing vomiting of blood accompanied by increased heart rate, then you should ensure that visiting an emergency room is the next thing you do. One should also be sure to visit an emergency room for vomiting blood as soon as possible if they are experiencing vomiting of blood accompanied by severe stomach pain. The subject matter experts over at frontlineer.com also advise that one should head to the emergency room as a matter of urgency if the blood vomiting has been persistent and recurring. Another reason to visit an emergency room for vomiting blood is if the blood vomiting is in large amounts. Those that are experiencing vomiting of blood accompanied by black, tarry stools should also ensure that they present themselves over to an emergency room as soon as they can. If you are also experiencing vomiting of blood after coming into contact with toxins and poisons such as lead, arsenic among others, then visiting an emergency room should be next on your agenda. One should also ensure that they visit an emergency room as soon as they can if they are experiencing vomiting of blood accompanied by high fever. You should also ensure that you head over to the emergency room for vomiting blood if you are experiencing vomiting of blood accompanied by chills or shivering. Another reason to visit an emergency room for vomiting of blood, as is recommended by the gurus over at frontlineer.com, is if you are experiencing vomiting of blood accompanied by difficulty swallowing. Those that are experiencing vomiting of blood accompanied by seizures should also ensure they visit an emergency room as soon as possible. If you are also experiencing an episode of vomiting of blood accompanied by a stiff neck, you should visit an emergency room pronto. One should make sure they head over to an emergency room…

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Vomiting blood Information | Mount Sinai – New York

Vomiting blood Hematemesis; Blood in the vomit Vomiting blood is regurgitating (throwing up) contents of the stomach that contains blood.Vomited blood may appear bright red, dark red, or look like coffee grounds. The vomited material may be mixed with food or it may be blood only. Considerations It may be hard to tell the difference between vomiting blood and coughing up blood (from the lung) or a nosebleed.Conditions that cause vomiting blood can also cause blood in the stool. Causes The upper GI (gastrointestinal) tract includes the mouth, throat, esophagus (swallowing tube), stomach and the duodenum (first part of the small intestine). Blood that is vomited may come from any of these places.Vomiting that is very forceful or continues for a very long time may cause a tear in the small blood vessels of the throat. This may produce streaks of blood in the vomit.Swollen veins in the walls of the lower part of the esophagus, and sometimes the stomach, may begin to bleed. These veins (called varices) are present in people with severe liver damage.Repeated vomiting and retching may cause bleeding and damage to the lower esophagus called Mallory Weiss tears.Other causes may include:Bleeding ulcer in the stomach, first part of the small intestine, or esophagusBlood clotting disordersDefects in the blood vessels of the GI tractSwelling, irritation, or inflammation of the esophagus lining (esophagitis) or the stomach lining (gastritis)Swallowing blood (for example, after a nosebleed)Tumors of the mouth, throat, stomach or esophagus Home Care Get medical attention right away. Vomiting blood can be a result of a serious medical problem. When to Contact a Medical Professional Call your health care provider or go to the emergency room if vomiting of blood occurs. You will need to be examined right away. What to Expect at Your Office Visit The provider will examine you and ask questions such as:When did the vomiting begin?Have you ever vomited blood before?How much blood was in the vomit?What color was the blood? (Bright or dark red or like coffee grounds?)Have you had any recent nosebleeds, surgeries, dental work, vomiting, stomach problems, or severe coughing?What other symptoms do you have?What medical conditions do you have?What medicines do you take?Do you drink alcohol or smoke? Tests that may be done include:Blood work, such as a complete blood count (CBC), blood chemistries, blood clotting tests, and liver function testsEsophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) (placing a lit tube through the mouth into the esophagus, stomach and duodenum)Rectal examinationTube through the nose into the stomach and then applying suction to check for blood in the stomachX-rays If you have vomited a lot of blood, you may need emergency treatment. This may include:Administration of oxygenBlood transfusionsEGD with application of laser or other modalities to stop the bleedingFluids through a veinMedicines to decrease stomach acidPossible surgery if bleeding does not stop References Kovacs TO, Jensen DM. Gastrointestinal hemorrhage. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil Medicine. 26th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2020:chap 126.Meguerdichian DA, Goralnick E. Gastrointestinal bleeding. In: Walls RM, Hockberger RS, Gausche-Hill M, eds. Rosen’s Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice. 9th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2018:chap 27.Savides TJ, Jensen DM. Gastrointestinal bleeding. In: Feldman M, Friedman LS, Brandt LJ, eds. Sleisenger and Fordtran’s Gastrointestinal and Liver Disease. 11th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2021:chap 20. Version Info Last reviewed on: 1/14/2021 Reviewed by: Michael M. Phillips, MD, Emeritus Professor of Medicine, The George Washington University School of Medicine, Washington, DC. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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