Top 10 Warning Signs You Need a New Job



The Balance/Catherine Song


Are you having a tough time at work? If you’re thinking about quitting your job, you’re in good company. According to data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), about 3 million workers quit their job each month. 

Depending on your circumstances, quitting might also be the best thing you can do for your career.

Sometimes, people wait too long to recognize that a job situation is not a good fit, and that can have all kinds of negative consequences. 

Of course, most people can’t afford to leave a bad job at the drop of a hat. When’s the best time to leave, and how do you know when you should make the decision to start a job search?

Contents

Are You Waiting Too Long to Move On?

Research shows that job stress can exacerbate physical and mental health problems. Prolonged stress can result in burnout and depression and increase the risks of hypertension, diabetes, and heart disease. 

Hold off on submitting your resignation for too long, and you may also do serious damage to your career, souring your relationship with your employer or even getting fired because you’re not productive.

10 Warning Signs You Need a New Job

You can prevent these possibilities by recognizing some of the signs that your job is unsustainable before the situation reaches a crisis status. 

1. You Are Already Thinking About Finding a New Job

Everyone has the occasional bad day at work. But if you find yourself daydreaming about quitting on a regular basis, there’s probably a good reason for it. Take that as a sign that it’s time to start job searching.

2. Your Conversation Is Dominated by Complaints About Work

If every dinner conversation starts and ends with negative commentary about your day at work, it might be time to find a job. While it’s normal to think about your job after hours, ideally some of that time should be spent pondering the day’s highlights and opportunities for growth. 

3. You Dream of Retirement—Even if You’re Young

Do you spend all fantasizing about retirement, calculating the years, months, and days until the time comes?

Don’t spend your professional life in countdown mode. Instead, take that feeling and use it as motivation to find a position that is satisfying and emotionally fulfilling.​

4. Your Sleep Patterns Have Been Disrupted

You have difficulty getting to sleep, or you wake up during the night with worries about your job. Sleep is essential to your health, and job-induced stress can be a cause of poor sleep. Unfortunately, this can exacerbate a difficult situation, making a bad job seem even worse. Being tired all the time can make everything seem like a challenge.

5. You Get Headaches or Frequent Colds

Your physical health can be an indicator of your mental health, and if you’re getting sick more often, your job might be to blame. If your job is literally making you ill, that’s a good indicator that it’s time to look for a new position.

6. You Are Drinking Too Much

While it’s OK to relax with a glass of wine after work, your day shouldn’t be driving you to down a bottle. If you find that your work is causing your copious consumption of alcohol, drugs, or cigarettes, you should take some time to reflect on your professional situation.

7. You Are Eating More (or Less) Than Usual

Some people turn to food in the same way they do to drugs and alcohol, but stress can also cause you to lose your appetite. If you’re eating or drinking too much because of stress at work, it’s a sign that this may not be the job for you.

8. You Dread Mondays or Have Trouble Waking up for Work

It’s normal to be tired in the morning, but you shouldn’t feel a dread each time the alarm goes off. If anxiety is consuming your thoughts and sapping your energy, consider moving on.

9. You Are Bored

How much time do you spend on social media during a typical workday? If that question makes you cringe, consider whether you’re bored at work. It might be time to look for a more mentally stimulating job.

10. You Are Arguing More Often With Co-Workers or Bosses

If your dissatisfaction with your job is causing tension in the office or if you have received warnings about your performance or behavior, it’s definitely time to start looking for a new position.

It’s better to leave a job on good terms so you can keep your past employer as a source for recommendations and as a networking connection. It’s best to avoid being fired if you can help it.

Of course, many of these signs can be indicators of other personal, emotional, or physical problems, but if you are stressed about work and experiencing some of these symptoms, then you certainly need to reevaluate your employment situation.

What to Do Next

If you’ve made the decision to move on, don’t just quit your job. In most cases, you can carefully and strategically start looking for a new position before you turn in your resignation. It’s easier to get hired when you’re working, and you don’t know how long it might take you to find a new job. Plus, you may not be able to collect unemployment benefits if you quit.

Take the time to plan your job search. In addition to getting you out of a bad situation, it will give you something else to focus on instead of the job you’d like to quit.

FAQs

How long should I wait before looking for another job?

To help settle the score, Twersky weighs in, ?The rule of thumb for minimum tenure before bailing on a job is one year.? Of course, as Twersky says, if you’re miserable at a job, ?you may want to mount a search sooner than your one-year anniversary.?

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What is the average time to find a new job?

The quick answer is 8 weeks or so, sometimes longer. Even once you land an interview, 52% of recruiters say the average time-to-hire takes 3 weeks. Overall, you should expect your job search to last anywhere from a few weeks to several months

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Is 8 months too soon to leave a job?

A recent survey from The Muse found 80% of millennial and Gen Z jobseekers say it’s acceptable to leave a new job before six months if it doesn’t live up to your expectations.

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Is 4 months too soon to leave a job?

It is not terrible form to leave one job after a few months; just don’t make leaving after a few months a habit. Having one brief stint on your resume is not a big deal?red flags arise if this behavior seems to be chronic or symptomatic of your inability to assess a company.

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How long should you stay at a job?

Experts tend to agree that you should stick with your current job for at least two years. The Bureau of Labor Statistics reported that as of January 2020, the median number of years that both wage and salary workers stay at their jobs is 4.1 years.

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How long do people stay unemployed?

In 1990, the average duration of unemployment in the United States was 12 weeks. The duration increased to 28.7 weeks in 2021, which was a significant increase from the previous year, and is likely due to the impact of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic.

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What is the typical salary increase when changing jobs?

What is a good salary increase when changing jobs? Generally speaking, a good salary increase when changing jobs is between 10-20%. The national average is around 14.8%, so don’t be afraid to ask for a similar increase. At a minimum, you should expect a wage growth of at least 5.8% when you change positions.

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What is the standard salary increase when changing jobs?

The salary hike in percentage terms one can expect while changing jobs is anywhere between 20 per cent and 40 per cent, depending on the industry you are working in. Therefore, your new salary expectation should be based on the hike in percentage terms as well as the industry benchmark.

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How long is too long without a job?

There is a downside to being unemployed for 9 months or more, and that downside encompasses both low and medium-skilled positions. According to the study’s results, once you’ve been unemployed for longer than 9 months, you can expect a significant drop-off in interview requests.

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Is it harder to get hired when you’re unemployed?

Research shows that employers discriminate against jobless candidates and tend to rate employed applicants higher on hireability. Also, the longer a person is unemployed, the lower the chances of getting an interview.

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What is considered a big gap in employment?

If you took two or three months between jobs, it’s usually not considered an employment gap but rather a job searching period. However, stretch that period to nine or ten months and most employers would consider that a full-fledged employment gap.

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How long is too long unemployed?

A special category of unemployment identifies people who’ve been unemployed for 27 weeks or more. They’re referred to as long-term unemployed. The long-term unemployed experience the aforementioned symptoms at a more heightened level.

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Why is it so hard to hire right now 2022?

Employee turnover is another major reason why hiring is so hard right now. According to ADP Research Institute’s People at Work 2022: A Global Workforce View, 7 in 10 workers have considered a major career change this year.

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Why do employers not like gaps in employment?

Because an employment gap raises so many questions, many of which aren’t raised explicitly, the employment gap is a resume killer. Employers are likely to skip over resumes with gaps because there are enough out there without one. This means that you need to get in front of employers aside from submitting a resume.

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Will the great resignation continue into 2022?

The Great Resignation will continue in 2022, according to a new survey by ResumeBuilder.com. In late December, ResumeBuilder.com polled 1,250 currently employed American adults about their employment plans for 2022.

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Why did so many people quit their jobs?

Nearly half of job-leavers are switching industries

Dowling points to two factors driving this exodus: pandemic-induced burnout and better odds of securing a higher-paid role in a tight labor market.

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10 Signs It's Time To Find A New Job – Forbes

10 Signs It’s Time To Find A New JobLook for signs it’s time to find a new job.getty It’s official—one in four workers plan on quitting their jobs in 2022, according to a new survey by ResumeBuilder.com. Clearly, the Great Resignation is not over. And it’s not just Gen Z and Millennials that are driving this trend. Research published in the Harvard Business Review shows that employees between 30 and 45 have had the greatest increase in resignation rates. While turnover is typically highest among younger workers, the study found that over the last year, resignations actually decreased for workers aged 20 to 25. But how do you know when it’s finally time to find a new job? If you’re a mid-career professional who has been thinking about making a career shift, here are ten telltale signs that it’s time to take the plunge. 1. Your well-being is suffering Gallup reports that employees who were struggling or suffering in their lives were about twice as likely to change jobs than those who were thriving. Managers, in particular, are suffering from high levels of burnout. This phenomenon is especially concerning, given that managers have the most significant impact on employee engagement. So, if you find that your role is negatively affecting your physical or mental health, it may be time to find a new job. 2. There is no opportunity for advancement Do you constantly wonder whether you have stayed at your job for too long? One reason you may be feeling stuck is that there is no opportunity to advance professionally. Don’t spend a lot of time in a position that doesn’t offer growth opportunities. If you are continually passed over for a promotion despite being a top performer, it’s probably time to look elsewhere. 3. The work environment is toxic If the atmosphere at work negatively impacts employees, you are probably in a toxic work environment. A toxic culture not only interferes with your career growth but may also damage your mental and physical health. If you find yourself in a company where bullying is tolerated, morale is low, or your input isn’t valued, you may want to explore other options. 4. You no longer feel challenged Are you basically in the same position you were two years ago? Can you complete work projects in your sleep? If you feel overqualified for your job, your career may be stalled. Try asking your manager for more challenging assignments. If they can’t offer you more stimulating projects, consider exploring external opportunities. 5. You aren’t paid what you are worth If you are underpaid and overqualified, that’s a red flag. Try to negotiate a higher salary before you look for a new job. Research compensation and make a case based on your contributions and value. If you struggle to live on your current salary and know you will earn more at another job, it may be time to leave. 6. You regularly fantasize about quitting Occasionally dreaming about quitting your job is normal. Even people who are content with their jobs have quitting fantasies—especially when you have a bad day. But when you start regularly daydreaming about storming into your manager’s office and announcing your resignation, it may be time to find a new job. 7. The company values don’t align with yours LinkedIn’s Workplace Culture report reported that 86% of Millennials would consider taking a pay cut to work at a company whose mission and values align with their own. Given that our professional and personal lives are more intertwined than ever, it is essential that the companies we work for share our values. If you regularly…

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10 Warning Signs You Need a New Job – The Balance Careers

Top 10 Warning Signs You Need a New Job The Balance/Catherine Song Are you having a tough time at work? If you’re thinking about quitting your job, you’re in good company. According to data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), about 3 million workers quit their job each month.  Depending on your circumstances, quitting might also be the best thing you can do for your career. Sometimes, people wait too long to recognize that a job situation is not a good fit, and that can have all kinds of negative consequences.  Of course, most people can’t afford to leave a bad job at the drop of a hat. When’s the best time to leave, and how do you know when you should make the decision to start a job search? Are You Waiting Too Long to Move On? Research shows that job stress can exacerbate physical and mental health problems. Prolonged stress can result in burnout and depression and increase the risks of hypertension, diabetes, and heart disease.  Hold off on submitting your resignation for too long, and you may also do serious damage to your career, souring your relationship with your employer or even getting fired because you’re not productive. 10 Warning Signs You Need a New Job You can prevent these possibilities by recognizing some of the signs that your job is unsustainable before the situation reaches a crisis status.  1. You Are Already Thinking About Finding a New Job Everyone has the occasional bad day at work. But if you find yourself daydreaming about quitting on a regular basis, there’s probably a good reason for it. Take that as a sign that it’s time to start job searching. 2. Your Conversation Is Dominated by Complaints About Work If every dinner conversation starts and ends with negative commentary about your day at work, it might be time to find a job. While it’s normal to think about your job after hours, ideally some of that time should be spent pondering the day’s highlights and opportunities for growth.  3. You Dream of Retirement—Even if You’re Young Do you spend all fantasizing about retirement, calculating the years, months, and days until the time comes? Don’t spend your professional life in countdown mode. Instead, take that feeling and use it as motivation to find a position that is satisfying and emotionally fulfilling.​ 4. Your Sleep Patterns Have Been Disrupted You have difficulty getting to sleep, or you wake up during the night with worries about your job. Sleep is essential to your health, and job-induced stress can be a cause of poor sleep. Unfortunately, this can exacerbate a difficult situation, making a bad job seem even worse. Being tired all the time can make everything seem like a challenge. 5. You Get Headaches or Frequent Colds Your physical health can be an indicator of your mental health, and if you’re getting sick more often, your job might be to blame. If your job is literally making you ill, that’s a good indicator that it’s time to look for a new position. 6. You Are Drinking Too Much While it’s OK to relax with a glass of wine after work, your day shouldn’t be driving you to down a bottle. If you find that your work is causing your copious consumption of alcohol, drugs, or cigarettes, you should take some time to reflect on your professional situation. 7. You Are Eating More (or Less) Than Usual Some people turn to food in the same way they do to drugs and alcohol, but stress can also cause you to lose your appetite. If you’re eating or drinking too much because of stress at work, it’s a sign that this may not be the job for you. 8. You Dread Mondays or Have Trouble Waking up for Work It’s normal to be tired in the morning, but you shouldn’t feel a dread each time…

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How To Successfully Find A New Job Online | Forbes

11 Signs It's Time For a New Job – TopResume

11 Signs It’s Time For a New Job Does your job leave you feeling unmotivated? You may need a new job… Is your career moving in the direction that you’d hoped? Do you still feel challenged, or do you face Sunday nights and Monday mornings with trepidation, hoping the days pass quickly so you can make it to the weekend? Before you hand in your resignation letter, use this checklist to determine if now’s the time to leave your job, or if you should try to make things work at your current place of employment. Signs that something needs to change: You work with unsupportive management and/or co-workers. The commute requires all your free time. The workload is growing and it’s impossible to do well. There are limited opportunities to gain new skills, networks, expertise, or certifications. You’re underpaid or the financial compensation isn’t enough to allow you to invest in yourself. It’s a challenge to find and cultivate mentorships with those more experienced than you. The position doesn’t provide intellectual stimulation or allow for risk-taking and you’re bored. If you’re experiencing a number of these signs, it’s time to re-evaluate your current situation. In some cases, a frank conversation with your boss may be the key to turning things around at your job. Remember, your manager can’t help you if you don’t let him or her know what’s going on. Brainstorm a list of solutions before you meet with your boss, and consider the following items to include in your negotiations: An intern or other support staff A more flexible work schedule or the option to telecommute The opportunity to work on more challenging or cross-functional projects with other teams A raise or promotion with additional responsibilities A stipend for professional development opportunities Access to the company’s internal training programs Be prepared to support these requests with evidence, proving the value you’ve brought to the company and/or the benefits these items would provide to the organization in the long run. Related: Career Quiz: Is It Time for a Career Change? Unfortunately, not every situation can be fixed with a conversation. If you’re experiencing any of the signs below, it’s time to start looking for a new job before things get worse.   You dread going to work, have lost enthusiasm, and start each day with a horrible feeling in the pit of your stomach. You’re not in the loop and it feels intentional that you’re the last to know what’s going on. You’re a cultural misfit and can’t shake the feeling that you just don’t fit in at the office. You’re desperate to leave and find yourself obsessively checking job boards for an opportunity — any opportunity — that would allow you to quit. The company’s struggling. If the signs are there, it’s better to start looking before layoffs begin and everyone is competing for the same positions. Your boss knows less than you do or is not very good at their job — and they’re not going anywhere. Your personal life is suffering. You have too many work commitments, not enough time with your family and friends, and it’s affecting your relationships. Your job is making you sick, and you’re stressed to the point that your work is causing health problems. You receive a bad performance review. If your reviews are usually fine and a negative one…

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How to find a new job while you're still employed – CIO.com

How to find a new job while you’re still employed Skip to content Thinkstock Your grandmother’s advice still stands: Don’t quit your current job until you have a written offer in hand. Yes, it is a job-seeker’s market, with more perks and flexibility on the table than in past years. But it can take months, requiring multiple rounds of interviews with several levels of signoffs, to actually land a new position at a different company. The “Great Resignation” — which sees people quitting in droves without having another job lined up — applies predominantly to hourly workers and not to tech experts, says Donald Burns, an executive career strategist and resume expert based in New York. “Most IT people aren’t leaving that way,” he says. For the majority of white-collar workers, “there are all kinds of delays [to finding a new job] due to economic uncertainty and extreme caution exercised by employers” because of bad experiences, he explains. Even for IT pros with hot skills, “it’s very, very difficult” to look for a job while holding one down at the same time, says Jayne Mattson, principal of an eponymous career management consultancy. “If the process goes too quickly, that can be a red light,” she adds. The job you’re applying for is open for a reason; make sure you do your due diligence. Still, if you believe that your existing job is no longer a fit for you, here are some tips for how to approach job hunting while keeping your current gig. 1. Look around, then take a deep breath It’s always good to see what jobs are available, and to know what your skills are worth on the open market. And now’s a good time to take a self-evaluation to see what you really want to do or determine what you need in a job to be happy. “Over the course of the pandemic, people have had the opportunity to reevaluate their career paths and jobs, and think through what’s next,” says Samantha Lawrence, senior vice president of people strategy at online jobs site Hired. 2. Don’t overlook the possibilities where you already work If the source of your displeasure is needing more flexibility — to, say, pick up your kids at school at a specific time — that might well be fixable. Or perhaps you want to work at home more often or receive more training opportunities. “Ask yourself what’s not working or what’s not fulfilling,” Hired’s Lawrence advises. “If it comes down to one or two things, and you can see yourself growing in your current company, have the conversation.” Approach your manager with what you want and work out a plan together that will address your needs. Perhaps you need to figure out when you will make up any time away from the job, or how you’ll come up to speed regarding any meetings you miss. “Because there’s so much attrition, companies are more open to having these conversations,” Lawrence says. And don’t forget to check out the careers section of your company’s website. It can be much easier to transfer to another division or team in your existing company than it is to start from scratch somewhere else. 3. Don’t burn bridges No matter how frustrated you are, don’t storm off in a huff. In the long term, it’s never worth it. At the very least you’re going to want a decent referral from your existing employer, and you don’t want to create a reputation as someone who leaves co-workers in a lurch. At some point you might wind up working with your former colleagues again — or even report to one — at another company. As satisfying as it can feel in the moment, leaving with little or no notice can come back to haunt you for years to come. (See #4, below.) 4. Build your human network The best way to find a job is through people you know who can vouch for your skills and knowledge, potential…

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Signs It May Be Time to Start Looking for a New Job

Signs It May Be Time to Start Looking for a New Job Have you ever found yourself suddenly unhappy in your job and willing to do just about anything to find a new one? Chances are good that you didn’t just wake up one day, walk into work and flip a switch that made you feel that way. Typically, job dissatisfaction evolves over time and if you can catch the early signs of it, you’ll be much more likely to leave your position on good terms.  👉 Catching signs of job dissatisfaction early on can help you leave your position on good terms, setting yourself up for future success. There are two places to look for these signs: in yourself and within your organization. The personal signs are the ones that have the ability to erode your happiness over time while the organizational ones are much more subtle and sometimes require you to do a bit of soul searching before deciding to look for a new job.  These signs have to do with you. They are often identifiable in your behaviors, attitude or feelings. The earlier you catch on to these signs, the better because you might be able to negotiate or implement changes into your current position instead of looking for a new job. If it’s not something that can be changed, then it’s better to acknowledge these signs early so you can start job searching without feeling desperate to get a new job. Here are some personal signs to be on the lookout for:  1. You’re disengaged from your job. You show up, go through the motions and you go home. You’re no longer trying to overachieve or come up with new ideas, you’re just there to do your job and get your paycheck.  2. You are stressed out more often than not. You’re tense all of the time, you’re snapping at your family and you feel like no matter what you do the stress just doesn’t let up. Being invested in your career is a great thing, but not if it’s to the point of jeopardizing your health.  3. It’s hard to get out of bed in the morning. Everyone has a hard time getting up on a rainy Monday morning, but if you’re feeling unmotivated or just plain grouchy about getting up and getting to work every day, it might be time to look for a new role (assuming there isn’t an underlying medical reason for this behavior).  4. You no longer get along with your supervisor or teammates. Maybe your old boss left and you don’t care for their replacement, or perhaps your teammates and you just don’t seem to work well together any longer. If you’re going to work every day dreading having to interact with the people you collaborate with on a daily basis, it’s time to start sending out some job applications.  5. You’re struggling financially. If you’ve taken on an extra job because you’re trying to save for a big vacation, that’s one thing, but if you’re working a second (or more) job just to make ends meet, consider looking for a new position. In this situation, definitely try to advocate for a raise before looking elsewhere, but don’t be afraid to pursue something more if you can’t get the salary you need or deserve.  6. Your work is no longer challenging. You’re bored. Every day you’re bored at work because you’re not being challenged. You might be able to bring this up with your boss and get some new projects to work on, but that’s not always possible so if that’s the case for you, start searching for a new challenge.  7. You’re taking frequent sick and/or mental health days. We all go through periods where life is difficult and we are taking more time off work than usual because we need to cope personally. However, if you’re not going through anything major outside…

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9 signs it's time to look for a new job – Workable resources

9 signs it’s time to look for a new job A ResumeBuilder.com poll found that 23% of respondents will quit  in 2022 – a sure way to send the labor market into yet another tailspin. So, if you’re experiencing your own feelings of discontent, you’re not alone. The question is, should you quit your job?  Signs you should look for a new job Dreading going to work? Passed over for yet another promotion? Earning less than you’re worth? These are just a few reasons to question your career and start looking for job opportunities. While taking the leap may seem terrifying, your well-being is important. There are potential employers out there for whom your well-being will be a priority too. As a place where you spend hours of your life, your workplace community needs to bring you joy, so take this opportunity to find it. Here are a few good reasons for looking for a new job: 1. Your work is not recognized A Bonusly poll found that 46% of respondents left their jobs because they felt underappreciated. You don’t need a gold star on your forehead, but recognition of excellent work is a great motivator and an incentive to continue giving your all. If your consistently good work goes unnoticed, it may be time to update your resume. 2. Ethical boundaries have been crossed You’ve been asked to do a task that goes against every moral fiber of your being (Check out no.12 on our list of workplace horror stories). What do you do now? Shush your conscience and turn a blind eye? It may be acceptable to some, but you don’t want to sully your good name. Share your concerns in writing and if your boss does not see a problem, start considering your new career move. 3. Your stress levels are through the roof The Workable mental health survey found that 40% of employers consider mental wellness a key factor in worker productivity and performance. So if you’re burning out with knock-on effects tainting your health and home life, it’s time to make a change. Speak to your boss about strategies to alleviate your load. If that doesn’t work, you may want to take your zen to another company. 4. You can’t be yourself at work Everybody has a work mask and a social mask. But when these two are separated by 180o, you may have a problem. The freedom to be true to your character means you’ll come across as an authentic person who’s right where they want to be. It’s a huge red flag if you’re in a position where you have to “fake it ‘til you make it”.  5. You’ve hit a career ceiling  Getting ahead in the workplace can happen in a variety of ways, but all with the same upward trajectory. If you feel like you’re stuck in a rut, consider where you’d like to see yourself and what you can do to get there. If your current place of employment doesn’t have the intention or resources to support your goals, it’s time to hitch your wagon to another star. 6. There have been a series of layoffs Not just one, but multiple rounds of layoffs can mean bad news for you, even if you’re still employed. Firstly, it’s likely that the company is struggling to solve its issues, so being laid off may not be too far on the horizon for you. Secondly, with a decreased workforce comes an increased workload for the remaining staff. It’s likely you’ll have the duties of your ex-coworkers added to yours. Have a candid conversation with your boss about the status of the company and your job, then make an informed decision from there. 7. You’re in a hostile work environment You’re either a victim or witness of acts at work that can only be categorized as harassment or discrimination. The less-illegal cousin to a hostile…

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