The Tradition Behind Leaving Christmas Decor Up Through January 6



decorated christmas tree

Photography: Polly Wreford / Styling: Marianne Cotterill / Direction: Sarah Keady

When should you take your Christmas tree down? Once Christmas Day and Twixmas passes, attention often turns to tidying the house and packing up the tree, including decorations (such as wreaths, lights and garlands) and cards. There’s often confusion – and debate – about the right time to do this. But you shouldn’t be tempted to take your Christmas decorations down too quickly because tradition stipulates that it should stay up for a little longer than you might think.

Twelfth Night

Christian tradition dating back to the 4th century marks Twelfth Night, the end of Christmas and the Eve of the Epiphany (Christian feast day), as the time to take down your Christmas tree and pack away your decorations again.

That means you can enjoy the twinkling lights for a little while longer, because Twelfth Night falls on either 5th or 6th January 2022 – and the dates depend on tradition. Be warned though: leaving your Christmas decorations up after this date is thought to bring bad luck.

After Advent, which is best described as the period of four weeks before Christmas in preparation and celebration of the birth of Jesus, Christmas celebrations traditionally started on Christmas Day and lasted for 12 days (known as the 12 Days of Christmas), finishing on the evening of 5th January, known as Twelfth Night.

The Epiphany on 6th January is a celebration in itself, marking the Magi – the Three Kings or Wise Men – visiting baby Jesus in his manger in Bethlehem, with their gifts of gold, frankincense and myrrh.

Read more: The best Christmas tree storage to buy – and the best storage solutions for all your decorations

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The Church of England celebrates Twelfth Night on 5th January, and the season of Epiphany from 6th January to 2nd February. However, some mark 6th January as Twelfth Night, counting the 12 days after Christmas Day, which is where the confusion stems from.

‘Twelfth Night is the night before Epiphany and is the night, tradition says, when Christmas decorations should be taken down,’ a Church of England spokesperson told The Telegraph. ‘Epiphany, on the other hand, is the day when the Church, theologically, marks the arrival of the wise men to give their gifts to the baby Jesus: the day when some will add the wise men to their nativity scenes.’

New Year’s Eve

There is another, perhaps lesser-known, tradition that in fact states that you should take your Christmas tree down on New Year’s Eve (31st December) before midnight. For the superstitious types, it is thought you may have bad luck in the New Year if you keep your tree up longer than this period.

christmas tree in the corner of a lliving room grey sofa and gold hexagon coffee tables, light pink walls and grey roman blindsreflected glory stunningmirroredbrass tables, bronzeandpinkbaublesandaccentsofgoldbringamodernopulence toarelaxedlivingroom

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Roman Catholics

However, Roman Catholic families can choose to keep their tree up until 2nd February, according to the traditions of Candlemas, which commemorates the presentation of Jesus at the Temple.

The Queen

Elsewhere, the Queen actually leaves her Christmas decorations up even longer, up until 6th February, which marks the anniversary of her father, King George VI’s death. He passed away in 1952 at Sandringham House where the royal family spend Christmas. In a normal year, the Queen typically stays at Sandringham until early February to mark the anniversary before returning to Buckingham Palace.


What to do with your real Christmas tree

after christmas

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While there are many traditions, whenever you decide to take down your Christmas tree, don’t forget to do your bit for the environment. If you have a real Christmas tree, remember that it can be recycled for composting and wood chipping – the chippings can then be used locally in parks or woodland areas.

Some councils will collect Christmas trees with normal garden waste, some will have designated collections and others will have special drop-off points. Visit your local authority’s website for further guidance. You’ll also find that many garden centres are happy to take old trees too. And, if you have a potted Christmas tree, remember you can plant it in the garden to give it life beyond the festive season.

Meanwhile, if you have rented a real Christmas tree this year, ensure you organise with your tree supplier when your tree will be collected.

Elsewhere, if you have an artificial Christmas tree, take a more eco-friendly approach and reduce waste by storing it and re-using each year. According to the Carbon Trust, an artificial Christmas tree needs to be used for 10 Christmases for it to have a lower carbon footprint than a real one.

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15 brilliant Christmas sacks to buy this year

Christmas Joy Patchwork Fabric Present Sack

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Selfridges is selling a range of paper sacks this year which can be personalised. Made with triple-ply wet strength natural kraft paper, it features a striped design and tag outline, where the name will be printed.

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This navy blue Christmas sack features gold star motifs and tassel drawstring pulls for a real festive feel. Have you got yours yet? 

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Made from velvet for a traditional feel and fastened with a drawstring, this Christmas sack is perfect to reuse every year. The words ‘Merry Christmas’ are embroidered in gold, surrounded by dots and stars.

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In a classic red, this sack has the words ‘Merry Christmas’ emblazoned on the front. It has lots of room for you to fill with pressies.

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Have a jolly Christmas with this red, green and white rocking horse sack. Made from soft cotton, it can also be personalised for an added touch. 

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We love this jute Christmas sack featuring a festive reindeer and sleigh design with a scattering of stars. With a vintage style font, it makes for a wonderful gift, too.

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Ideal for delivering and holding presents just like Santa, this personalised monogram sack has a sprig of holly and red stars on the front.

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FAQs

What date do you take Christmas tree down 2022?

That means you can enjoy the twinkling lights for a little while longer, because Twelfth Night falls on either 5th or 6th January 2022 ? and the dates depend on tradition. Be warned though: leaving your Christmas decorations up after this date is thought to bring bad luck

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What is the correct date to take down your Christmas tree?

Jan. 5: Take your tree down on this day, traditionally considered the Twelfth Day of Christmas ? i.e., the last of 12 days of Christmas merriment. Think of it as getting closure on the holiday season.

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Is it bad luck to take down Christmas decorations early?

A day sooner or later is considered unlucky, and if the decorations are not removed on Twelfth Night then they should stay up all year

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Is 12th night the 5th or 6th of January?

Twelfth Night is a Christian festival marking the beginning of Epiphany. A count of exactly 12 days from 25 December takes us to 5 January. According to the Church of England, this day is Twelfth Night. However, the day of Epiphany falls on the following day ? 6 January.

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When should decorations come down?

Officially, it is any time after the Twelfth Night, which is the 12th night after Christmas Day (January 5). However, many people take down their decorations on the day of the Epiphany (January 6) as they consider that to be the 12th night after Christmas.

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Is it bad luck to take Christmas tree down before New Years?

Dec. 31: Take your tree down on New Year’s Eve before the bells toll at midnight. Otherwise, it’s said you’ll be dragging all your baggage and bad luck from last year into the new year? if you’re superstitious about these things, that is.

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What is the etiquette for taking down Christmas decorations?

She told Newsweek: “The official end of the festive season is the 6th of January, so taking decorations down any time from the 1st through to the 6th is recommended.

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Is it bad luck to take down your Christmas tree the day after Christmas?

Jan.

6 in observance of the Epiphany, a Christian holiday marking the revelation of God in human form in the person of Jesus. Again, some would say leaving your tree up beyond the 5th or 6th brings bad luck.

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Is leaving your Christmas tree up bad luck?

Is it bad luck to leave Christmas decorations up? No, it is not bad luck to leave Christmas decorations up. In fact, it’s a modern idea to take Christmas decorations down on the 5th or 6th January.

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How long should Christmas decorations stay up?

For many in the west, Christmas Day is the ?First day of Christmas?, so, the 12 days run to January 5th, which is Epiphany Eve – when the three wise men visited Jesus Christ.

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Why do some people still have their Christmas tree up?

Some people believe it’s bad luck to leave decorations up after Epiphany. However, Orthodox Christians celebrate Christmas on Jan. 7, and would keep their trees up longer.

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Can I keep my Christmas tree up until February?

Most home and garden centers will tell you that the five-week mark is when a real Christmas tree starts to become a fire hazard. But if you want to keep your Christmas tree alive as long as possible, check the water levels daily and refill as needed, and you can likely stretch the life of your tree to six weeks.

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According to Tradition, You Should Leave Your Christmas …

The Tradition Behind Leaving Christmas Decor Up Through January 6 According to Tradition, You Should Leave Your Christmas Tree Up Until January 6—Here’s Why If you’ve been looking for a reason to keep your Christmas decorations up a bit longer, this is it. When it comes to holiday decorations, there are two kinds of people: Those who take down their Christmas trees on December 26, and those who aren’t quite ready for the season to be over. And while taking down the tree is usually less fun than putting it up, there’s actually another good reason many people wait to do it. So, if you’ve been looking for an excuse to keep listening to Christmas music and admiring your festive decor, you’re in luck: Tradition says you should be celebrating Christmas (and leaving your decorated tree up) through January 6. You’re probably familiar with the song about the 12 days of Christmas—but you may not have known that the 12 days don’t actually start until Christmas Day, meaning there are almost two full weeks of celebrating to do after Santa arrives. According to Christian tradition, January 6 marks the day the three kings actually arrived in Bethlehem and signals the end of the Christmas celebrations. ClarkandCompany/Getty Images This day is called The Feast of Epiphany, The Twelfth Night, or Three Kings Day, and in some parts of the world, it signifies a celebration that’s just as big as the one on Christmas Day. And while we’ll welcome any excuse to leave the red and gold ornaments and multicolor strand lights up a little longer, tradition says it’s actually unlucky to take your tree down before this date. Now you know how long to leave the Christmas tree up. When you finally take down the tree, don’t just leave it on the curb; you can actually recycle live Christmas trees by finding a recycling program or having them chipped into mulch for your garden. While the Christmas festivities technically end on Epiphany, the holidays aren’t over just yet. The day also marks the official start of the Mardi Gras season, so it’s tradition to serve King Cake on January 6. The tradition of Three Kings Day is actually where the name “king cake” comes from—and why there’s a tiny plastic baby hidden inside.

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When to Take Down Your Christmas Tree, According to Tradition

When Should You Take Down Your Christmas Tree? This Answer Might Surprise YouThe end of the holiday season means a fridge packed full of Christmas dinner leftovers and the beginning of operation cleanup time. Part of the post-holiday tidying up process will inevitably involve putting away your Christmas lights, tackling that monstrous stack of dirty dishes in the sink, and, of course, figuring out when to take down the Christmas tree.For some reason, determining the best time to drag your spruce out to the curb (or stick your artificial tree back in the garage) tends to be a hot-button topic year after year. It’s right on up there with the real tree or artificial tree debate — some people just have really strong feelings about it. This content is imported from poll. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.So, when should you take down your Christmas tree?If you find yourself stumped over this very question (or continually debating about this with your spouse at Christmas dinner), perhaps consider letting tradition be your guide. Dating back to the fourth century, many Christians have marked the end of the Christmas season on the Twelfth Night (or 12 nights after Christmas) — an evening also known as the Eve of the Epiphany. Charlie Wright / EyeEmThe Epiphany marks the day the Three Kings (or Wise Men) visited baby Jesus, and is either celebrated on January 5 or January 6 (depending on whether you count Day One as Christmas or not). Although Christian groups reportedly disagree over which date is the correct one, tradition dictates that the Twelfth Night is the best time to take down your festive decorations — including your tree. It’s believed that waiting too long after the Twelfth Night will bring bad luck. Of course, all of this to say that you should really take down your Christmas tree when it’s the most convenient time for you and your family. (For example, Dolly Parton leaves her tree up until after her birthday, on January 19!) Whether that’s the day after Christmas, New Year’s Eve, or whenever you can get to it, there’s really no true “correct” answer. After all, you worked really hard hanging up all those ornaments — you should enjoy it for as long as you want. Kayla Keegan leads Good Housekeeping’s editorial growth strategies in the partnership, news, social, branded, membership and newsletter spaces. Prior to her new position, she was the Senior News and Entertainment Editor for the brand, covering and editing all things in the entertainment, pop culture and celebrity world for Good Housekeeping. She’s also worked as a social editor for House Beautiful and had previous writing stints at Redbook, Cosmopolitan and Seventeen.This content is imported from OpenWeb. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.

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Here's When to Take Down Your Christmas Tree

Here’s When to Take Your Christmas Tree DownCountry Living editors select each product featured. If you buy from a link, we may earn a commission.Why Trust Us?There’s absolutely nothing wrong with decorating early for Christmas—in fact, we’re here for it. (Year-round Christmas stores and Hallmark Christmas movies exist for a reason, right?!) And although the argument continues about how early is too early, another debate is stirring: When should you take your Christmas tree and other holiday decorations down? There are plenty of folks who leave their homes all twirled up until New Year’s Day or beyond. Or perhaps you’re in the camp of immediately taking your Christmas tree down on December 26. But there’s actually some interesting history behind putting it all away that may help inform your packing-up-the-Christmas-decorations date.To help you answer the question of when to take down Christmas decorations, we’re breaking down everything there is to know about dismantling your Christmas tree right here. This content is imported from poll. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.When do you take down your Christmas tree? Does it have to be by a certain day?Some people put their tree away the day after Christmas; others wait until the first or second week of January. So, which is right? As with most things, it depends on who you ask. There are tons Christmas fanatics who start decorating as soon as the Thanksgiving plates are cleared (if not right after Halloween!) and keep their Christmas tree up for as long as possible. After all, according to experts, putting your holiday decorations up early could make you feel happier, so it makes sense that leaving them up could have the same effect. And who wouldn’t want that? Others feel the need for the Christmas clutter to be cleaned up as soon as the last gift is opened. So when should you put your tree away? The short answer is: Do whatever feels right for you!Elizabethsalleebauer//Getty ImagesIs there history behind when to take down your Christmas tree?For those who keep Christ in Christmas, this information may inform your decision a bit. According to Catholic religion, you should hold off taking down your Christmas tree until January 7. Although many believe that the 12 days of Christmas are the days leading to December 25 (that’s thanks to popular songs and movies that represent it that way), in Catholicism, the 12 days actually start on December 25 and last through January 6, which is known as Epiphany (or when the Three Wise Men came to visit Jesus). Once Epiphany is over, it’s time to toss the tree. So when to take down Christmas decorations in Catholic church is more than a full week following Christmas Day—not just when you want a fresh start to the New Year, which for many includes the house going back to normal. Top Products for Taking Down Your TreeZOBER Ornament Storage BoxVICMORE Tree Removal BagZOBER Underbed Ornament Storage BoxZOBER Tree Storage BagWhen should you take down your Christmas tree to avoid a fire hazard?Now here’s a very important point that’s imperative to keep in mind. If you opt for a real Christmas tree, you should consider how long it will last before drying out. Most home and garden centers will tell you that the five-week mark is when a real Christmas tree starts to become a fire hazard. But if you want to keep your Christmas tree alive as long as possible, check the water levels daily and refill as needed, and you can likely stretch the life of your tree to six weeks. Just be sure to keep a close eye on the needles—if you notice they’re turning yellow or brown or feel crunchy to the touch, it’s time…

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When to take your Christmas tree down: Twelfth Night tradition …

The two common dates when you traditionally take down your Christmas tree Photography: Polly Wreford / Styling: Marianne Cotterill / Direction: Sarah Keady When should you take your Christmas tree down? Once Christmas Day and Twixmas passes, attention often turns to tidying the house and packing up the tree, including decorations (such as wreaths, lights and garlands) and cards. There’s often confusion – and debate – about the right time to do this. But you shouldn’t be tempted to take your Christmas decorations down too quickly because tradition stipulates that it should stay up for a little longer than you might think. Twelfth NightChristian tradition dating back to the 4th century marks Twelfth Night, the end of Christmas and the Eve of the Epiphany (Christian feast day), as the time to take down your Christmas tree and pack away your decorations again.That means you can enjoy the twinkling lights for a little while longer, because Twelfth Night falls on either 5th or 6th January 2022 – and the dates depend on tradition. Be warned though: leaving your Christmas decorations up after this date is thought to bring bad luck.After Advent, which is best described as the period of four weeks before Christmas in preparation and celebration of the birth of Jesus, Christmas celebrations traditionally started on Christmas Day and lasted for 12 days (known as the 12 Days of Christmas), finishing on the evening of 5th January, known as Twelfth Night.The Epiphany on 6th January is a celebration in itself, marking the Magi – the Three Kings or Wise Men – visiting baby Jesus in his manger in Bethlehem, with their gifts of gold, frankincense and myrrh.Read more: The best Christmas tree storage to buy – and the best storage solutions for all your decorations House Beautiful/Dan Duchars The Church of England celebrates Twelfth Night on 5th January, and the season of Epiphany from 6th January to 2nd February. However, some mark 6th January as Twelfth Night, counting the 12 days after Christmas Day, which is where the confusion stems from. ‘Twelfth Night is the night before Epiphany and is the night, tradition says, when Christmas decorations should be taken down,’ a Church of England spokesperson told The Telegraph. ‘Epiphany, on the other hand, is the day when the Church, theologically, marks the arrival of the wise men to give their gifts to the baby Jesus: the day when some will add the wise men to their nativity scenes.’New Year’s EveThere is another, perhaps lesser-known, tradition that in fact states that you should take your Christmas tree down on New Year’s Eve (31st December) before midnight. For the superstitious types, it is thought you may have bad luck in the New Year if you keep your tree up longer than this period. House Beautiful/Mark Scott Roman CatholicsHowever, Roman Catholic families can choose to keep their tree up until 2nd February, according to the traditions of Candlemas, which commemorates the presentation of Jesus at the Temple.The QueenElsewhere, the Queen actually leaves her Christmas decorations up even longer, up until 6th February, which marks the anniversary of her father, King George VI’s death. He passed away in 1952 at Sandringham House where the royal family spend Christmas. In a normal year, the Queen typically stays at Sandringham until early February to mark the anniversary before returning to Buckingham Palace.What to do with your real Christmas…

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When to Take Down Your Christmas Tree to Avoid Bad Luck

You Can (Supposedly) Avoid Bad Luck By Taking Your Christmas Tree Down on This Day December 28, 2021 at 12:00pm PM EST If you purchase an independently reviewed product or service through a link on our website, SheKnows may receive an affiliate commission. We wish we could keep our Christmas trees up year-round. No room will ever feel cozier than when it’s filled with garland, twinkling lights and of course, a decorated tree. There’s something about walking into a room and smelling the citrusy aroma of a pine tree or having twinkly lights on in the evenings that makes us extraordinarily reluctant to leave this one piece of Christmas behind. Related story This Pretty Kitchen Tool Keeps Herbs Fresh for an Amazing 3 Weeks & It’s 18% Off Right Now Alas, Christmas is over, and the time to take down our beautifully decorated, delightful-smelling trees is fast approaching. Although some people (perhaps a Scrooge?) are thrilled to get an oversize plant out of their house, many of us feel quite sad about letting go of the tree. We’re happy to put it off for as long as possible — maybe even a little too long. Before you decide to get rid of the tree, it’s a good idea to check with your city to see if there are any restrictions for throwing out a tree or if they have scheduled pickup dates for them. Now, you’ve decided to clear the room of all Christmas cheer (insert crying emoji here) and all that’s left to do is pick a date. Some people choose dates for superstitious reasons, some for religious reasons and some just pick a date that’s most convenient for them (usually sometime in February). Here are three of the most popular dates to take down the tree: Dec. 31: Take your tree down on New Year’s Eve before the bells toll at midnight. Otherwise, it’s said you’ll be dragging all your baggage and bad luck from last year into the new year… if you’re superstitious about these things, that is. Jan. 5: Take your tree down on this day, traditionally considered the Twelfth Day of Christmas — i.e., the last of 12 days of Christmas merriment. Think of it as getting closure on the holiday season. Jan. 6: Take it down on Jan. 6 in observance of the Epiphany, a Christian holiday marking the revelation of God in human form in the person of Jesus. Again, some would say leaving your tree up beyond the 5th or 6th brings bad luck. Of course, taking down the tree and properly storing all of those ornaments and lights requires a few key products. Here are some of our favorite holiday organizers to help make this year’s tree take-down and next year’s tree assembly a breeze. Our mission at SheKnows is to empower and inspire women, and we only feature products we think you’ll love as much as we do. QVC is a SheKnows sponsor, however, all products in this article were independently selected by our editors. Please note…

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Epiphany 2022: when to take your Christmas tree down, and …

Epiphany 2022: when to take your Christmas tree down, and other Twelfth Night traditions While New Year’s Day marks the end of the Christmas period, remnants of the holiday festivities still remain. The surplus of food will be used to make meals until it comes to its natural end, but when to take down your Christmas tree and decorations continues to be an ongoing debate.  Is January 5 or 6 the best day to tackle the task? And what happens if you leave them up for longer? Are you really struck down with bad luck for the rest of the year as superstition would have you believe? One thing’s for sure – everyone does it differently, and everyone has their own ideas. When should you take your Christmas decorations down? In Britain, tradition has it that Christmas decorations stay up until Twelfth Night.  Twelfth Night is a festival in some branches of Christianity which marks the beginning of Epiphany.  A count of exactly 12 days from 25 December arrives at January 5. According to the Church of England, this day is Twelfth Night. The day of Epiphany – when the three wise men came – is the day after, on January 6.  Not everyone agrees however. Many other Christian groups count the 12 days of Christmas as starting the day after Christmas Day – making January 6 the Twelfth Night. Countries which also follow the January 6 tradition include Germany, Poland and the Czech Republic.  So which date is correct?  Both. Although in the UK, Wednesday 5 January 2022 is the date most people will stick to. What if you forget to take down your Christmas decorations? Most people think that it’s bad luck to leave your decorations up after January 5. Some people think it’s also wrong to take them down too early, too. In ancient times, people believed that tree-spirits lived in the holly and ivy. After the festive season, they would be released outside but if they were let go before Christmas ended, there could be problems with the harvest as a result. According to one superstition, Christmas decorations not taken down by Twelfth Night should be left up until Candlemas Day (February 2) and then taken down. Other people say the best remedy is to leave them up until Twelfth Night the following year. Whatever date you choose, it is worth noting that the ‘rules’ have changed over history. February 2, in fact, actually used to be the date when Christians took their decorations down, as noted in this poem by Robert Herrick (1591-1674): “Down with the rosemary, and so  “Down with the bays and mistletoe; “Down with the holly, ivy, all,  “Wherewith ye dress’d the Christmas Hall” – Ceremony upon Candlemas Eve In these more modern times, though, most of us stick to Twelfth Night as the correct date. The history of Epiphany In the West, Christians began celebrating Epiphany in the 4th century and up until the 19th century, it was more important than Christmas Day. The date celebrates both the three kings’ (or three wise men’s) visit to Jesus shortly after his birth and also Jesus’ baptism by John the Baptist. According to the Gospel of Matthew, the three wise men — Melchior, Caspar and Balthazar — followed the star of Bethlehem across the desert to meet the baby Jesus, offering gifts of gold, frankincense and myrrh. The gifts were symbolic of the importance of Jesus’ birth, the gold representing his royal standing; frankincense his divine birth; and myrrh his mortality. The word ‘Epiphany’ comes from Greek and means ‘manifestation’. It…

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When should you take down your Christmas tree?

Some people keep their Christmas tree up for weeks. Some toss it on Jan. 2. Who’s right?Janis Nicolosi-Endo walked into her Fair Lawn home on Monday evening after work, eight days after Christmas and three days into a new year, greeted by the twinkling lights of her Christmas tree. She loves her Christmas tree.  “Oh, I’m obsessive about it. I water it at least twice a day,” she said. And her tree may not come down until two weeks after Christmas, or however long it stays healthy. (The average live Christmas tree lasts four to five weeks from the time it’s cut down, according to a study by Louisiana State University.)She’s not alone in wanting to keep the Christmas cheer going as long as she possibly can. Americans who celebrate Christmas typically keep the tree up three weeks after the holiday, according to an unscientific survey by Treetopia, an online seller of artificial Christmas trees. But then there are those who can’t wait to toss the tree to the curb as soon as the last gift is unwrapped and the bottles of Baileys are drained. The iconic tree at Rockefeller Center came down on Jan. 2 last year — although this year it will stay up until Jan. 16. So whose tradition is right? The answer often comes down to what makes you happy.Nicolosi-Endo said she has gotten into the tradition of going to the mountains to cut down a tree. The act of finding a live tree, decorating it, putting all the lights on it and focusing on the thoughts of peace and brotherhood is a balm to her soul: “Community. That is what I love about it.” “I mean honestly, I would just turn on the lights and I just sit and look at it, and it’s just a comforting feeling,” she said.  More:Hope for the holidays? Start with your Christmas treeRelated:Here’s what happens to your beloved Christmas tree once it’s dragged to the curbFor others, taking down the Christmas tree is based on family custom, religious tradition — or maybe even a recycling schedule. Just remember that live trees purchased at tree stands are often harvested as early as mid-November. It’s important to give trees plenty of water and remove them before they dry out, to prevent a fire. According to a study done by the Christmas Tree Promotion Board, 20 million to 25 million real Christmas trees are sold in the U.S. every year, Taking down the tree after the Epiphany Jan. 6, known as Three Kings Day or the Feast of the Epiphany by Christians, commemorates the visit of the Three Wise Men to baby Jesus. It also ends the “12 Days of Christmas” celebrated in the traditional carol.For many, that’s the earliest day to take down the decorations. Some people believe it’s bad luck to leave decorations up after Epiphany. However, Orthodox Christians celebrate Christmas on Jan. 7, and would keep their trees up longer.Arlene Alvira, a resident of Fair Lawn, said, “Normally our Christmas decorations do not come down until after Three Kings Day.” This week’s looming cold snap prompted her to remove the outdoor decorations sooner. “But the indoor decorations will not be coming down until the 9th or later,” she said.  Recycle your Christmas treeThat coincides with Fair Lawn’s curbside collection of discarded Christmas trees, which runs from Jan. 10 until Jan. 14.Regardless of…

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When to Take Your Christmas Tree Down, According to Tradition

Here’s When You Should *Really* Take Your Christmas Tree DownEvery item on this page was chosen by a The Pioneer Woman editor. We may earn commission on some of the items you choose to buy.Whether you put your Christmas tree up the day after Thanksgiving or on Christmas Eve, the sad truth is that eventually it will have to come down. Goodbye, bright lights, pretty ribbons, and DIY ornaments—until next year, that is! The question is, when exactly should you take down your Christmas tree? Some people want to enjoy their festive display as long as possible, while others start dismantling their decor the day after Christmas. While it’s ultimately up to you to decide when to start storing your decorations, there are actually some rules about when to take down a Christmas tree, regardless of whether it’s real or artificial. Here’s the history behind when and why you should take down your Christmas tree by a certain date.How did the tradition of Christmas trees start?Though there’s some debate, most historians think the Christmas tree has roots in Christianity and first became popular in Germany in the Middle Ages. “Paradise trees” were decorated with apples, communion wafers, or cookies and displayed in homes on December 24, the Christian feast day of Adam and Eve. Religious reformer Martin Luther supposedly added candles in the 1500s, and by the 19th century, German-born Prince Albert, husband of Queen Victoria, popularized the idea in England. Victorian trees were decorated with toys, candies, and popcorn strings. As Germans migrated, they brought their trees to other countries, and Christmas trees finally became popular in America by the 1870s. According to tradition, a Christmas tree should be kept up until 12 nights after Christmas. In the Christian religion, the Christmas season ends on the Epiphany, which is celebrated on January 6. This marks the date when the Three Kings arrived to bring gifts to baby Jesus, and reportedly dictates the best time to take down your holiday decorations—including the Christmas tree. Some people even believe that waiting too long after the Twelfth Night to take the tree down could bring bad luck!This content is imported from poll. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.Of course, when to take down your Christmas tree is a personal choice. That said, those with live trees need to be a little more careful. When should you take a Christmas tree down to avoid a fire?Fresh trees can last a month or more if you know how to keep a Christmas tree alive. The trick? The absolute freshest tree is one you buy locally and cut down yourself, ideally at one of the best Christmas tree farms in your area. If it’s a pre-cut tree, sap can seal off the bottom of the tree and prevent it from taking up water in the stand, so make a fresh cut straight across the trunk, removing about a ¼-inch disk from the bottom.Adam C Bartlett//Getty ImagesMost importantly, make sure your tree stand holds a quart of water per inch of stem diameter; for most trees, you’ll need a Christmas tree stand that holds at least a gallon. And don’t get lazy! Check the stand daily. Some stands still may have water but the trunk isn’t submerged, so get down and take a look to be on the safe side. Once your tree starts to get crispy, extra dry, or drop tons of needles, it can become a fire hazard. The good news is that Christmas tree fires aren’t as common as you might suspect—though that doesn’t mean they don’t happen at all. According to the National Fire Protection Association, fire departments respond to about 160 home fires that start with Christmas trees per year. In most cases, the fire was caused by faulty lighting or electrical issues, while heat sources such as candles too close to the tree caused fires about 20 percent of the time. That means it’s important to inspect your lights and toss them whenever they’re damaged or frayed and to keep your tree…

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When should you take your Christmas tree down? – Metro

Christmas: When should you take your tree and decorations down? Sooner or later the tree has to come down (Picture: Getty Images)Christmas and New Year’s is officially over for another year, as we move into the early days of 2022 – meaning it is back to work and time to start those resolutions (or not). But with the centrepiece of the festivities having come and gone, folks may be starting to give thought to when the Christmas tree – and the decorations – might have to be taken down and packed away for another 12 months. It’s a long-held tradition that it is bad luck to keep decorations up too long – but how long is too long? Let’s take a look. When should you take your Christmas tree and decorations down? Some people take down their tree and decorations on Boxing Day, while others remove theirs on January 1. Officially, it is any time after the Twelfth Night, which is the 12th night after Christmas Day (January 5). However, many people take down their decorations on the day of the Epiphany (January 6) as they consider that to be the 12th night after Christmas. You can keep the festive cheer going a little longer (Picture: Getty Images)Clearly, it depends on your definitions – but either way, they should be removed on either of those dates to avoid 2022 being unlucky for you. If you miss that crucial January 6 date, there is still a way to avoid misfortune. There is an old tradition that was marked by Christians in the 1500s that had people keeping their decorations up until Candlemas on February 2. So if you forget to take down your decorations, you can always wait until then too. When is the Epiphany and Twelfth Night? The Epiphany is on January 6, 2022, meaning that the Twelfth Night is on January 5, 2022. What is the Epiphany? The Epiphany signals the official end of Christmas and marks the baptism of Jesus by John the Baptist. The name ‘epiphany’ is actually Greek and means ‘manifestation’ with the date itself being a celebration of God coming to Earth as a human in the form of his son. The date is also when the Three Kings (aka the Three Wise Men) arrived to meet the baby Jesus after following a bright star to Bethlehem and handed over their gifts of gold (to symbolise his royal standing), frankincense (to symbolise his divine birth) and myrrh (to symbolise his mortality). Epiphany is also known as ‘Three Kings Day’ in some countries (Picture: Getty)And in case you didn’t know – frankincense and myrrh are both fragrances. Frankincense is a milk-white resin extracted from Boswellia trees and myrrh is a reddish resin from the Commiphora myrrh tree. The Three Kings, known as the ‘Magi’, were called Melchior, Caspar and Balthazar. Some suggest they are meant to represent Europe, Arabia and Africa. Why is it called the Twelfth Night? In the olden days, Christmas wasn’t just a one-day event – it was actually celebrated for 12 days. This began on Christmas Eve, December 24, and was celebrated every day up until the Epiphany. The 12 days begins on Christmas Day itself. That means that January 5 was celebrated just as much as…

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National Take Down the Christmas Tree Day – National Today

National Take Down the Christmas Tree DayAfter the bustle and excitement of the Christmas season, National Take Down the Christmas Tree Day on January 6 provides the perfect end to the season. It’s the last of the 12 days of Christmas and encourages us to finally let go of the holidays, take down our trees, and usher in Epiphany.Christmas trees have been around since the 1500s, some say even earlier, and have become an integral part of the Christmas festivities.Just like the celebrations, the time you choose to take down your Christmas tree is completely at your discretion. Many people take theirs down right after the opening of gifts on Boxing Day, and others leave it up until New Year’s Day, or even for a while after. However, if you’re one of those people who simply can’t seem to get around the depressing chore, National Take Down the Christmas Tree Day may present you with the perfect opportunity.Founded by the ‘Queen of Holidays’, Jace Shoemaker-Galloway, the day is celebrated annually on January 6. This day is vital in Christmas history, as it marks the 12th and last day of Christmas, and is the day Epiphany takes place.Epiphany is a feast day, celebrating the revelation of God as Jesus Christ. In Western Christianity, the feast commemorates Jesus’ physical manifestation to the Gentiles by the visit of the Magi to the Christ Child. Eastern Christians, on the other hand, commemorate the baptism of Jesus in the Jordan River, marking his manifestation to the world as the Son of God. The earliest reference to Epiphany as a Christian feast was in 361 A.D.National Take Down the Christmas Tree Day was created to add some excitement to the usually difficult process of letting go of the festive Christmas season. Take down your trees and usher in a new season.National Take Down the Christmas Tree Day timeline361 A.D.Time for EpiphanyThe earliest reference to Epiphany as a Christian feast is made.1576Christmas Trees are InA keystone sculpture of a Christmas tree is found in a private home in Turckheim, Alsace.1800sChristmas Trees are RoyalChristmas trees spread amongst the nobility and to royal courts as far as Russia.1900sChristmas Trees are Made PublicPutting up public Christmas trees outdoors becomes hugely popular. National Take Down the Christmas Tree Day FAQsWhat is the official date to take down Christmas decorations? Although you are allowed to take down your decorations when you deem fit, the official day to take down your Christmas decorations is on January 5 or January 6, right after the twelve-day celebration.Can a cut Christmas tree regrow? Yes, a cut tree can be replanted and it can grow again. This process is called recycling.What kind of trees are Christmas trees? Traditional Christmas trees usually have a pine or fir origin. Noble fir, Douglas fir, and White pine are some of the varieties used as Christmas trees.National Take Down the Christmas Tree Day ActivitiesTake down your Christmas treeWhat else is there to do on National Take Down the Christmas Tree Day besides actually taking down your tree? Call on friends and family to come and help, and to add an element of excitement to the activity.Recycle your treeDid you put up a real Christmas tree this…

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