Should I Go To Urgent Care for Dehydration?



Dehydration occurs when the body does not have a sufficient amount of fluids to properly function and you lose more fluids are consumed. This can easily occur on a hot day when your body produces sweat to stay cool, or when you are sick and vomit or have diarrhea.

Mild dehydration can usually be treated at home simply by drinking more fluids. Moderate cases of dehydration may require you to visit the hospital and receive fluids intravenously of through an IV. Severe dehydration should be considered a medical emergency as it can be fatal when it is not treated. If necessary, go to the nearest hospital, quick care clinic or urgent care center for treatment.

Dehydration can happen to anyone at any age including infants, young children, and older adults who are at a higher risk for becoming dehydrated.

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Your body is comprised of about 55%-60% water. It is important to consume a large amount of water in order for your body to complete routine daily functions. The average adult requires about three quarts of water each day. When you do not take in enough water due to an illness or because of other reasons, you may begin to experience mild signs of dehydration.

Common causes of dehydration in healthy adults include the following:

  • Sweating in response to activity or extreme heat
  • Fever
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea

Signs and symptoms of dehydration are dependent on your age and how severe your dehydration is. Signs of dehydration in babies and young children can include:

  • Dry mouth or tongue
  • Crying without the production of tears
  • Not having a wet diaper for 3 or more hours
  • High fever
  • Sunken eyes or cheeks
  • Drowsiness, being lethargic or sleepy

Signs of mild to moderate dehydration in adults include:

  • Feeling thirsty
  • Dry and sticky mouth
  • Dry skin
  • Infrequent urination
  • Dark yellow urine
  • Headache
  • Muscle cramps

Severe dehydration is defined by the loss of 10-15% of the water in the body. Signs and symptoms of severe dehydration include the following:

  • Not urinating at all or having extremely dark yellow pee
  • Dry skin
  • Dizziness
  • Rapid heartbeat or breathing
  • Sunken eyes
  • Feeling lethargic
  • Tiredness, confusion or irritable
  • Fainting

Mild to moderate dehydration can usually be treated at home. Below are the recommendations to reverse the effects of dehydration.

  • Slowly drink water
  • Eat ice cubes or popsicles
  • Slowly drink a beverage which contains electrolytes
  • Avoid driving caffeinated beverages which includes coffee, tea, or soda. Caffeine may cause more frequent urination.

Moderate to severe dehydration needs medical attention. Go to an emergency room or call 911. Untreated severe dehydration can cause seizures, permanent brain damage, and even death.

Call your family doctor if you’re not sure if your symptoms are serious enough to go to the hospital.

Prevention

In general, adults can prevent dehydration by simply drinking water when they are thirsty. Consuming foods which have a high water content like fruits and vegetables is also beneficial. It is important to be familiar with the situations which can cause dehydration. Be sure to drink addition fluids when you need to, including:

  • During hot weather, especially if you will be outside
  • When exercising or producing high volumes of sweat
  • When you have a high fever, diarrhea, or are vomiting

Do not wait for these signs of dehydration to kick in before you start drinking liquids. Plan ahead and make sure you always have access to sufficient quantities of water.

Some groups of people are at a higher risk for becoming dehydrated including:

  • Infants and young children
  • Older adults
  • People who have a chronic illnesses such as diabetes
  • People who are taking specific medications

If you are at greater risk or are a caregiver for someone who is at high risk for dehydration, be sure to plan ahead and always have plenty of water with you in order to prevent dehydration.

When it remains untreated, dehydration can lead to serious complications which can include:

  • Heat-related illness such as heat cramps, heat exhaustion, or heatstroke
  • Kidney issues: kidney stones and kidney failure
  • Electrolyte imbalances which can lead to a disturbance in heart rhythm and seizures.
  • Shock, coma, and even death

More on Dehydration : What are the Symptoms of Dehydration?

FAQs

When should you see a doctor about dehydration?

Call 911 or go to the emergency room (ER) right away if you have: Weakness. Dizziness or fainting. Drowsiness or confusion.

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When should you get treated for dehydration?

If your dehydration is serious, you may need to see a doctor to get treated with intravenous (IV) fluids. Severe dehydration may require you to go to the hospital. You should get medical attention immediately if you: Haven’t pee

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What are serious signs of dehydration?

Signs of dehydration include:

  • Headache, delirium, confusion.
  • Tiredness (fatigue).
  • Dizziness, weakness, light-headedness.
  • Dry mouth and/or a dry cough.
  • High heart rate but low blood pressure.
  • Loss of appetite but maybe craving sugar.
  • Flushed (red) skin. Swollen feet. Muscle cramps.
  • Heat intolerance, or chills.

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Should I go to the emergency room for dehydration?

Moderate to severe dehydration needs medical attention. Go to an emergency room or call 911. Untreated severe dehydration can cause seizures, permanent brain damage, and even death. Call your family doctor if you’re not sure if your symptoms are serious enough to go to the hospital.

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How do I know if I need IV fluids?

A person needs IV fluids when they become dangerously dehydrated. Serious dehydration may occur when you: Are sick (vomiting and diarrhea). Exercise too much or spend too much time in the heat without drinking enough.

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What is the fastest way to cure dehydration?

The fastest way to cure dehydration is to take an oral rehydration solution and treat the underlying cause of fluid loss. With mild or moderate dehydration, drinking plenty of fluids should be enough to replenish your fluids.

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How do hospitals treat dehydration?

Severe Dehydration Treatment

If necessary, your doctor can treat dehydration by giving you intravenous (IV) fluids. This may take place in a hospital or outpatient care facility. While your body is rehydrating, you will be monitored for low blood pressure, a rapid heart rate, or abnormal kidney function.

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What hydrates better than water?

Research shows that milk is one of the best beverages for hydration, even better than water or sports drinks. Researchers credit milk’s natural electrolytes, carbohydrates, and protein for its effectiveness.

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How long does it take for water to hydrate you?

It can take just 5 minutes to begin rehydrating your body. On the other hand, if you drink water while eating, your body will prioritize digesting food before water. This often takes up to 120 minutes to digest water and rehydrate your body.

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Should I Go To Urgent Care for Dehydration?

Should I Go To Urgent Care for Dehydration? Dehydration occurs when the body does not have a sufficient amount of fluids to properly function and you lose more fluids are consumed. This can easily occur on a hot day when your body produces sweat to stay cool, or when you are sick and vomit or have diarrhea. Mild dehydration can usually be treated at home simply by drinking more fluids. Moderate cases of dehydration may require you to visit the hospital and receive fluids intravenously of through an IV. Severe dehydration should be considered a medical emergency as it can be fatal when it is not treated. If necessary, go to the nearest hospital, quick care clinic or urgent care center for treatment. Dehydration can happen to anyone at any age including infants, young children, and older adults who are at a higher risk for becoming dehydrated. Improved Health Your body is comprised of about 55%-60% water. It is important to consume a large amount of water in order for your body to complete routine daily functions. The average adult requires about three quarts of water each day. When you do not take in enough water due to an illness or because of other reasons, you may begin to experience mild signs of dehydration. Common causes of dehydration in healthy adults include the following: Sweating in response to activity or extreme heat Fever Vomiting Diarrhea Signs and symptoms of dehydration are dependent on your age and how severe your dehydration is. Signs of dehydration in babies and young children can include: Dry mouth or tongue Crying without the production of tears Not having a wet diaper for 3 or more hours High fever Sunken eyes or cheeks Drowsiness, being lethargic or sleepy Signs of mild to moderate dehydration in adults include: Feeling thirsty Dry and sticky mouth Dry skin Infrequent urination Dark yellow urine Headache Muscle cramps Severe dehydration is defined by the loss of 10-15% of the water in the body. Signs and symptoms of severe dehydration include the following: Not urinating at all or having extremely dark yellow pee Dry skin Dizziness Rapid heartbeat or breathing Sunken eyes Feeling lethargic Tiredness, confusion or irritable Fainting Mild to moderate dehydration can usually be treated at home. Below are the recommendations to reverse the effects of dehydration. Slowly drink water Eat ice cubes or popsicles Slowly drink a beverage which contains electrolytes Avoid driving caffeinated beverages which includes coffee, tea, or soda. Caffeine may cause more frequent urination. Moderate to severe dehydration needs medical attention. Go to an emergency room or call 911. Untreated severe dehydration can cause seizures, permanent brain damage, and even death. Call your family doctor if you’re not sure if your symptoms are serious enough to go to the hospital. Prevention In general, adults can prevent dehydration by simply drinking water when they are thirsty. Consuming foods which have a high water content like fruits and vegetables is also beneficial. It is important to be familiar with the situations which can cause dehydration. Be sure to drink addition fluids when you need to, including: During hot weather, especially if you will be outside When exercising or producing high volumes of sweat When you have a high fever, diarrhea, or are vomiting Do not wait for these signs of dehydration to kick in before you start drinking liquids. Plan ahead and make sure you always have access to sufficient quantities of water. Some groups of people are at a higher risk for becoming dehydrated including: Infants and young children Older adults People who have a chronic illnesses such as diabetes People who are taking specific medications If you are at greater risk or are a caregiver for someone who is at high risk for dehydration,…

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Common Dehydration Signs That Require Medical Attention

Common Dehydration Signs That Require Medical Attention August 13, 2018 By State Urgent Care Dehydration occurs when your body loses more fluid than it takes in. Medically speaking, you are considered dehydrated when the body loses the ability to function normally. Some dehydration signs can include excessive sweating and extended periods of vomiting or diarrhea (longer than 24 hours). Anyone can suffer from dehydration, however, the condition can be much more serious in children and senior adults. A recent Harvard study found that more than one-third of American adults are chronically dehydrated. Among children, this number may be as high as 50%. Read on to learn more about the signs you need to be on the lookout for. Common Dehydration Signs It is very important to consume lots of water and other liquids. Thirst is not a reliable indicator of dehydration. By the time, you feel thirsty, you are already mildly dehydrated. Mild to Moderate Dehydration: Signs of mild dehydration include dry mouth, decreased urination, confusion, headaches and muscle cramps. You can rectify a case of mild dehydration rather easily by drinking water or other liquids. Rather than consume a sugary rehydration drink adding a pinch of Himalayan salt to your water to replace lost minerals. Salty soups and broths are also helpful in this regard. If you are having difficulty swallowing or keeping fluids down, start with small spoonfuls and increase as you begin to feel better. Serious Dehydration There are several signs of serious dehydration that should not be ignored. You should immediately seek clinical care if you are experiencing any of the following: 1. Your urine is very dark or you are not urinating at all. If you haven’t peed in over 8 hours, seek medical attention immediately. Urine should be a pale yellow, similar to the color of lemonade, not dark. 2. You are feeling disoriented and confused. 3. Have had a seizure. 4. You are feeling dizzy when you stand. This is a sign that your blood pressure is dropping dramatically. A general feeling of overall physical weakness is also a symptom of severe dehydration. 5. You are experiencing weak or rapid pulse. 6. Your skin has lost its elasticity and appears dry and shriveled. If you pinch the skin, it will take a few seconds to return to its normal position. 7. Sunken eyes. Signs of Dehydration in Infants and Children While dehydration is a serious issue for an adult, it is especially dangerous for infants and children. If your child is experiencing the following symptoms, seek medical attention immediately: 1. Extreme sleepiness. If your child is having a hard time waking up or staying awake, he or she may be seriously dehydrated. 2. Less responsive than usual. Lethargy is also a common symptom of dehydration. 3. Fewer wet diapers, or dark yellow pee, is a sure sign a child is dehydrated. 4. Other signs include cold hands and feet and no tears when crying. Urgent Care If you, or your child, are exhibiting any of the above dehydration signs, it is important to seek medical attention immediately. If you are in the Starksville area visit us at State Urgent Care for immediate treatment. We are open from 8:00 am and 7:00 pm daily. We offer IV fluid therapy for severe dehydration.

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Dehydration | Cedars-Sinai

Articles Dehydration Not what you’re looking for? What is dehydration? Dehydration is when you don’t have enough water in your body. The human body normally contains a lot of water. It helps keep your body healthy and working well. Mild dehydration can cause problems with blood pressure, heart rate, and body temperature. Severe dehydration can also cause weakness or confusion. In extreme cases, it can lead to brain damage and even death. Everyone loses body water daily through sweat, tears, breathing, urine, and stool. This water is replaced by drinking fluids and eating foods that contain water. Dehydration can have many causes. You may have lost water from diarrhea or vomiting. Or you may be sweating from exercise or hot weather. Loss of water often leads to an imbalance of electrolytes in the body. Electrolytes are minerals and salts that the body needs to function. They include sodium, potassium, magnesium, and calcium. What causes dehydration? Dehydration can be caused by: Sweating from hot weather, exercise, sauna use Diarrhea Vomiting Fever Some medicines that cause extra urination, such as diuretics (water-pills) Who is at risk for dehydration?  You are more at risk if you: Have diarrhea Have vomiting Are in hot weather Are sweating a lot from exercise Are an older adult age 60 or older What are the symptoms of dehydration? Symptoms can occur a bit differently in each person. They can include: Thirst Tiredness Dizziness Lightheadedness Muscle cramps Dry mouth Less urine Urine that’s dark yellow or even light brown in color Headache Dry skin or tongue Fainting Confusion Fast heart rate and breathing The symptoms of dehydration can look like other health conditions. See your healthcare provider for a diagnosis. How is dehydration diagnosed? Your healthcare provider will ask about your symptoms and health history. The provider may also ask about recent illness or activity. You will also have a physical exam. Your blood pressure, temperature, and heart rate will be checked. You may have blood or urine tests. How is dehydration treated? Treatment will depend on your symptoms, your age, and your general health. It will also depend on how severe the condition is. You also may be treated for diarrhea, vomiting, or a high fever if illness caused your dehydration. For moderate to severe dehydration, you may need IV (intravenous) fluids. Severe dehydration is a medical emergency. It needs to be treated right away with IV fluids in a hospital. For mild dehydration, you can drink fluids. You may need to restore not just water, but also electrolytes such as sodium and potassium. Sports drinks can replace water and electrolytes. You can also drink water, fruit juices, tea, and soda. Don’t have drinks with caffeine. These include some energy drinks, teas, sodas, and coffee drinks. Don’t drink alcohol. Caffeine and alcohol may cause your body to lose more water. Talk with your healthcare providers about the risks, benefits, and possible side effects of all treatments. What are possible complications of dehydration?  Severe dehydration that is not treated can cause kidney damage, brain damage, and death. What can I do to prevent dehydration? Advice varies. On average, an adult should drink about 2 to 3 quarts of fluid per…

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Dehydration Symptoms, Causes and Treatment

Dehydration Symptoms, Causes and TreatmentWhat is Dehydration?Dehydration happens when your body uses more water than you are drinking. The result is your body doesn’t have enough water or other fluids to carry on its normal functions. Mild dehydration is easy to reverse – simply drink more water. Severe dehydration, on the other hand, requires immediate treatment.During hot weather or in times of illness, the body may not have the amount of fluids it needs to function properly. Sweating, fever, vomiting and diarrhea deplete the body of fluids and can cause medical emergency.Dehydration can be a major problem in most cities in Texas including Houston, Sugar Land, Austin and College Station, TX. If you have become overheated and are experiencing the symptoms of dehydration, you should visit the emergency room near you immediately to make sure you do not pass out or have other severe side effects of being dehydrated.Our 24-hour emergency rooms treat dehydrated patients. Our board-certified physicians are available 24/7 and wait times in our ER is 10 minutes or less.Symptoms of DehydrationDehydration is not always obvious and there is usually no reliable indication that your body needs water. Most older people, for instance, do not always feel thirsty until it may be too late and they are already dehydrated. That is why it is essential that you drink water when the weather is hot or during illness.Here are a few symptoms of dehydration that you should be aware of. Go to the nearest emergency room immediately if you notice any of these symptoms of dehydration.Signs of Dehydration in AdultsExtreme thirstConfusionDizzinessFatigue or excessive tirednessDark-colored urineLess frequent urination or less urge to urinateSigns of Dehydration in ChildrenIrritability or listlessnessSunken eyesDry mouth or tongueLack of tears when cryingSunken cheeksDiapers not wet after three hoursSunken soft spot on top of headCauses of DehydrationSometimes dehydration results because you are just too busy or you forget to drink enough water. Other times, it could happen because you are traveling, hiking or you are just in a place where you do not have access to safe drinking water. Whatever the reason, here are a few factors that can cause medical emergencies.SicknessSevere Diarrhea – Severe diarrhea can cause you to lose a lot of water in a short amount of time. A sudden onset of diarrhea may be caused by a reaction to medication, food disorders, food poisoning, a bacterial infection or a viral infection.This can quickly lead to severe dehydration and should be addressed by a medical professional as quickly as possible.Vomiting – Loss of water from vomiting may be from sickness or a reaction to food or medicine. Vomiting that is coupled with sudden onset of diarrhea raises the risk for severe and sudden dehydration.Fever – When there is a fever, the human body uses fluids to fight it off. The higher the temperature rises the more fluid your body uses. If fever is associated with vomiting or diarrhea, there is an increased risk for dehydration, especially in the very young and the elderly.Increased Urination – This symptom may indicate an underlying medical condition that has yet to be diagnosed. Signs of increased urination may lead to dehydration and should be discussed with a medical professional.Chronic Illness – Having a chronic illness means that the body has to work harder to maintain fluid levels. Those with chronic cough, diabetes, heart disease, liver disease, and other conditions need to stay properly hydrated.Excessive activitySweating – Participation in sports or working out in humid weather can lead to excessive sweating. If fluids are not replaced during the activity, the body’s fluid level can become depleted and you could become dehydrated. This is especially a concern for children and young adults as they may not know the warning signs of dehydration.AgeChildren and infants – Young children are more likely to experience diarrhea. Additionally, a young child may not be able to communicate the warning signs of dehydration such as dry mouth, headache,…

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Dehydration Information | Mount Sinai – New York

Dehydration Vomiting – dehydration; Diarrhea – dehydration; Diabetes – dehydration; Stomach flu – dehydration; Gastroenteritis – dehydration; Excessive sweating – dehydration Dehydration occurs when your body does not have as much water and fluids as it needs.Dehydration can be mild, moderate, or severe, based on how much of your body’s fluid is lost or not replaced. Severe dehydration is a life-threatening emergency. A decrease in skin turgor is indicated when the skin (on the back of the hand for an adult or on the abdomen for a child) is pulled up for a few seconds and does not return to its original state. A decrease in skin turgor is a late sign of dehydration. Causes You can become dehydrated if you lose too much fluid, do not drink enough water or fluids, or both. Your body may lose a lot of fluid from:Sweating too much, for example, from exercising in hot weatherFeverVomiting or diarrheaUrinating too much (uncontrolled diabetes or some medicines, like diuretics, can cause you to urinate a lot) You might not drink enough fluids because:You do not feel like eating or drinking because you are sickYou are nauseatedYou have a sore throat or mouth soresOlder adults and people with certain diseases, such as diabetes, are also at higher risk for dehydration. Symptoms Signs of mild to moderate dehydration include: ThirstDry or sticky mouthNot urinating muchDarker yellow urineDry, cool skinHeadacheMuscle cramps Signs of severe dehydration include:Not urinating, or very dark yellow or amber-colored urineDry, shriveled skinIrritability or confusionDizziness or lightheadednessRapid heartbeatRapid breathingSunken eyesListlessnessShock (not enough blood flow through the body)Unconsciousness or delirium Exams and Tests Your health care provider will look for these signs of dehydration:Low blood pressure. Blood pressure that drops when you stand up after lying down.White finger tips that do not return to a pink color after your provider presses the fingertip. Skin that is not as elastic as normal. When the provider pinches it into a fold, it may slowly sag back into place. Normally, skin springs back right away.Rapid heart rate. Your provider may do lab tests such as:Blood tests to check kidney functionUrine tests to see what may be causing dehydrationOther tests to see what may be causing dehydration (blood sugar test for diabetes) Treatment To treat dehydration:Try sipping water or sucking on ice cubes.Try drinking water or sports drinks that contain electrolytes.Do not take salt tablets. They can cause serious complications.Ask your provider what you should eat if you have diarrhea. For more severe dehydration or heat emergency, you may need to stay in a hospital and receive fluid through a vein (IV). The provider will also treat the cause of the dehydration.Dehydration caused by a stomach virus should get better on its own after a few days. Outlook (Prognosis) If you notice signs of dehydration and treat it quickly, you should recover completely. Possible Complications Untreated severe dehydration may cause:DeathPermanent brain damageSeizures When to Contact a Medical Professional You should call 911 or the local emergency number if: The person loses consciousness at any time.There is any other change in the person’s alertness (for example, confusion or seizures).The person has a fever over 102°F (38.8°C).You notice symptoms of heatstroke (such as rapid pulse or rapid breathing).The person’s condition does not improve or gets worse despite treatment. Prevention To prevent dehydration:Drink plenty of fluids every day, even when you are well. Drink more when the weather is hot or you are exercising.If anyone in your family is ill, pay attention to how much they are able to drink. Pay close attention to children and older adults.Anyone with a fever, vomiting, or diarrhea should drink plenty of fluids. DO NOT wait for signs of dehydration.If you think you or someone in your family may become dehydrated, call your provider. Do this before the person becomes dehydrated. References Kenefick RW, Cheuvront SN, Leon LR, O’Brien KK….

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Dignity Health: Treating Dehydration in Arizona

Dehydration in Arizona Skip to Main Content Dignity Health: Treating Dehydration in Arizona Secure your spot in one of our urgent care facilities or emergency rooms Dehydration occurs when there is not enough water or fluids in the body. Your body’s organs need these vital fluids to work properly. Untreated, dehydration can quickly become a life-threatening condition. At Dignity Health, our emergency doctors are dedicated to providing personalized care to treat dehydration in Arizona. If you are experiencing a life-threatening symptom, call 9-1-1. Dehydration Symptoms The symptoms of dehydration in adults can include: Thirst Less urine, or not urinating as often as normal Headaches — the most common symptom Dry, sticky lips and mouth Sluggishness and fatigue Dizziness In infants, dehydration symptoms include fewer tears than normal and no wet diapers for several hours. When to Call 911 or Go to the ER Severe dehydration is life threatening for children and adults. You should call 9-1-1 or go to your nearest urgent care center for these symptoms: Urinating small amounts of dark-colored urine Not urinating Severe diarrhea or vomiting Muscle cramps Weakness and dizziness Confusion Sunken eyes Dry and shriveled skin with little elasticity Change in consciousness or alertness For infants, be aware of these symptoms: Limp body posture Very soft spot on top of the head (s)unken fontanel Fussiness Extreme sleepiness If you need to go to the ER, use our InQuicker™ online tool by selecting your estimated hospital arrival time and wait at home until your time to be seen. Upon arrival and check-in, you will see a doctor who will assess your situation and determine the next appropriate level of care. Dehydration Causes The primary cause of dehydration is not drinking enough water. Body fluids are lost through sweat and urine, and need to be replaced throughout the day. If you notice you are thirsty, it is a sign that you are already dehydrated. Certain situations can cause dehydration to happen much faster: Being at high elevation Drinking alcohol Extra activity and sweating Excessive heat and low humidity These conditions can cause the body to lose too much water, leading to dehydration: Type 1 diabetes Diarrhea or vomiting from an upset stomach or stomach flu Treatment with diuretics to lower blood pressure or to treat fluid buildup (for heart failure) Morning sickness during pregnancy Severe Dehydration Treatment When you visit a doctor at Dignity Health for dehydration symptoms, he or she will perform a physical exam, during which blood and urine samples will be taken and tested. These tests will help your doctor determine the severity of your condition and whether an underlying medical problem, such as diabetes, is the cause. If necessary, your doctor can treat dehydration by giving you intravenous (IV) fluids. This may take place in a hospital or outpatient care facility. While your body is rehydrating, you will be monitored for low blood pressure, a rapid heart rate, or abnormal kidney function. As part of our emergency services, Dignity Health provides prompt care to diagnose and treat all stages of…

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Dehydration – familydoctor.org

Dehydration Dehydration is when your body doesn’t have enough fluids to work properly. It happens when you lose more fluids than you take in. This could happen on a hot day if you sweat a lot, or if you are sick with vomiting or diarrhea. You can usually treat mild dehydration at home by drinking more fluids. Moderate cases may need to go to the hospital to receive intravenous (IV) fluids. Severe dehydration is a medical emergency. It could be fatal if not treated. Dehydration can happen to anyone at any age. Infants, young children, and older adults are more at risk of becoming dehydrated. Path to improved health Your body is made up of 55%-60% water. You need to drink a lot so it can carry out its normal functions. The average adult needs about 3 quarts of water every day. When you don’t get enough water because of illness or for other reasons, you may start to experience dehydration. Causes Common causes of dehydration in healthy adults include: sweating too much (especially in hot weather) fever vomiting diarrhea Symptoms Symptoms of dehydration depend on your age and how badly dehydrated you are. Signs of dehydration in babies or young children include: dry mouth and tongue crying without tears no wet diapers for 3 hours or more high fever sunken eyes being unusually drowsy or sleepy Signs of mild to moderate dehydration in adults include: feeling thirsty dry or sticky mouth dry skin not urinating much darker yellow urine headache muscle cramps Signs of moderate to severe dehydration include: dizziness or light-headedness irritability or confusion rapid heartbeat rapid breathing listlessness delirium fainting or unconsciousness Treatment Mild to moderate dehydration can usually be treated at home. Here are things you can do to feel better. Sip water. Suck on ice cubes or ice pops. Slowly drink a sports drink that contains electrolytes. Don’t drink anything with caffeine, including coffee, tea, or colas. Caffeine may cause you to urinate more. Moderate to severe dehydration needs medical attention. Go to an emergency room or call 911. Untreated severe dehydration can cause seizures, permanent brain damage, and even death. Call your family doctor if you’re not sure if your symptoms are serious enough to go to the hospital. Prevention In general, adults can prevent dehydration just by drinking when they are thirsty. Eating foods high in water content, such as fruits and vegetables, also helps. Know the causes of dehydration. Drink more fluids when you need to, including when: The weather is hot, especially if you’ll be outside. You are exercising or sweating a lot. You have a fever, diarrhea, or are vomiting. Don’t wait for signs of dehydration to start drinking more. Plan ahead and always make sure you have access to plenty of water. Things to consider Some people are at greater risk of becoming dehydrated. They include: Infants and young children Older adults People with chronic illnesses such as diabetes People taking certain medicines, such as diuretics. If you are at greater risk or care for others who are, always plan ahead. Keep plenty of water with you at all times to prevent dehydration. Left untreated, dehydration can lead to serious complications. These include: Heat-related illness such as heat cramps, heat exhaustion, or heatstroke. Kidney problems such as kidney stones or kidney failure. Electrolyte imbalances that can lead to heart rhythm disturbances and seizures. Shock, coma, or death. Questions to ask your doctor Could there be an underlying cause that led me to become dehydrated? How can I keep from getting dehydrated in the future? Can I take my regular medicines when I’m dehydrated? Can I drink alcohol without getting dehydrated? I work outside in the summer. What can I do to prevent dehydration? Copyright © American Academy of Family Physicians This information provides a general overview and may not apply to everyone. Talk to your family doctor to find out if this information applies to you and to get more information on this subject.

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Dehydration – Diagnosis and treatment – Mayo Clinic

Dehydration – Diagnosis and treatment DiagnosisYour doctor can often diagnose dehydration on the basis of physical signs and symptoms. If you’re dehydrated, you’re also likely to have low blood pressure, especially when moving from a lying to a standing position, a faster than normal heart rate and reduced blood flow to your extremities. To help confirm the diagnosis and pinpoint the degree of dehydration, you may have other tests, such as: Blood tests. Blood samples may be used to check for a number of factors, such as the levels of your electrolytes — especially sodium and potassium — and how well your kidneys are working. Urinalysis. Tests done on your urine can help show whether you’re dehydrated and to what degree. They also can check for signs of a bladder infection. More Information TreatmentThe only effective treatment for dehydration is to replace lost fluids and lost electrolytes. The best approach to dehydration treatment depends on age, the severity of dehydration and its cause. For infants and children who have become dehydrated from diarrhea, vomiting or fever, use an over-the-counter oral rehydration solution. These solutions contain water and salts in specific proportions to replenish both fluids and electrolytes. Start with about a teaspoon (5 milliliters) every one to five minutes and increase as tolerated. It may be easier to use a syringe for very young children. Older children can be given diluted sports drinks. Use 1 part sports drink to 1 part water. Most adults with mild to moderate dehydration from diarrhea, vomiting or fever can improve their condition by drinking more water or other liquids. Diarrhea may be worsened by full-strength fruit juice and soft drinks. If you work or exercise outdoors during hot or humid weather, cool water is your best bet. Sports drinks containing electrolytes and a carbohydrate solution also may be helpful. Children and adults who are severely dehydrated should be treated by emergency personnel arriving in an ambulance or in a hospital emergency room. Salts and fluids delivered through a vein (intravenously) are absorbed quickly and speed recovery. Preparing for your appointmentYou’re likely to start by seeing your or your child’s doctor. However, in some cases when you call to set up an appointment, the doctor may recommend urgent medical care. If you, your child or an adult who you care for is showing signs of severe dehydration, such as lethargy or reduced responsiveness, seek immediate care at a hospital. If you have time to prepare for your appointment, here’s some information to help you get ready, and what to expect from the doctor. What you can do Write down any symptoms you or the person you’re caring for is experiencing, including any that may seem unrelated to the reason for which you scheduled the appointment. If you or the person you’re caring for has been vomiting or has had diarrhea, the doctor will want to know when it began and how frequently it’s been occurring. Write down key personal information, including any recent trips taken or foods recently eaten that might have caused illness. In addition, your doctor will want to know if you or the person you’re caring for has recently been exposed to anyone with diarrhea. Make a list of key medical information, including other conditions you or the person you’re caring for is being treated for and the names of the medications being taken. Include on your list prescription…

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6 Signs of Severe Dehydration and How to Treat It

6 Signs of Severe Dehydration and How to Treat It | GoHealth Urgent CareChances are you suffer from chronic dehydration. After all, show that over 75% of Americans do. That’s close to 246 million people.While dehydration is common, it doesn’t look the same in everyone. Its signs and symptoms can vary depending on the person affected, as well as the severity of the condition. Infants and children, as well as the elderly, are at increased risk for dehydration. Plus, what doctors classify as a mild to moderate case of dehydration varies from severe dehydration.Catching it early is key to proper dehydration treatment and prevention of a more serious case that could become life-threatening.What Is Dehydration?Dehydration occurs when an individual loses more fluid than they take in. Since the body is made up of two-thirds water, it’s essential for human life. In fact, water plays a large role in normal body functions, like facilitating digestion, lubricating the joints and eliminating toxins to keep the skin healthy.Even if your body has only , it can have adverse effects that present themselves in the form of dehydration symptoms. A fluid deficit from water loss can leave you feeling thirsty or sleepy, as well as having a mild headache, dry mouth with bad breath or muscle cramps, often referred to as “charley horses.” You likely won’t have the urge to use the bathroom as frequently, as you’ll experience minimal urine output.What Happens to Your Body When It Dehydrates?If you’re feeling thirsty, your body is likely already dehydrated. Why is this the case? Because your thirst mechanism lags behind your actual level of hydration.Losing body water without replacing it results in your blood becoming more concentrated. This causes your heart rate to increase to maintain your blood pressure, and it triggers your kidneys to retain water (hence, decreased urination).Less water in your system also hinders your body’s ability to regulate your temperature, which can lead to hyperthermia, or a body temperature that’s well above normal. And because fluid levels in the brain lower, they affect your mood, memory and coordination.6 Signs of DehydrationAs fluid loss worsens from one being mildly to moderately to severely dehydrated, it can lead to signs of mental and physical decline that will need immediate action for reversal. If  symptoms of severe dehydration are concerning enough, they may also require the assistance of a medical professional.1. Not Urinating or Very Dark UrineAn easy way to test and see if you’re dehydrated is checking the color of your urine. Normal urine should be pale yellow in color, like lemonade. If your urine is a darker color, similar to apple juice, this could be a sign of moderate to severe dehydration. Not urinating at all? You’re most likely severely dehydrated.What to do: Should you find your urine is a dark yellow, be sure to start drinking more water immediately. It’s best to take small sips of water your body can properly absorb, rather than gulping down glass after glass of water that your kidneys will expel. If you feel you’re not getting enough fluids on a regular basis, consider taking a large water bottle with you to drink throughout the day—at work, in the car and on the go.2. Dry Skin That Doesn’t Bounce Back When PinchedChecking the color of your urine is not the only quick test you can perform to…

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When to go to the Emergency Room for Dehydration

When to go to the Emergency Room for DehydrationAt times, we have all felt the effects of dehydration and there are some symptoms you should not ignore. Severe dehydration can lead to death, making it important for you to seek medical treatment right away should you experience certain symptoms.Palpitations/chest painsIf you are dehydrated and begin to feel chest pains, you should go directly to the emergency room. These are not your typical pains; they are pains where it feels like an elephant is sitting on your chest or that your heart is going to beat right out of your chest. These are symptoms of a possible cardiac event as a result of being dehydrated and should be treated immediately.Lack of urine Urination is necessary for the natural release of fluids. When you urinate, not only is your body disposing of excess fluids but the toxins in your body as well. It is vital that your kidneys and bladder are working together all of the time to ensure that the toxins are gone or they can lead to more serious conditions. If you or a loved one has gone more than 24 hours without urination, it is important to go directly to the emergency room. This is an early sign of renal failure and only a doctor can offer IV fluids that are necessary to get you hydrated again.Causes of dehydrationAnother element that determines the extent of your dehydration could be what caused it in the first place. For instance, if you have been outside in the heat all day and did not drink enough water, it is likely you will feel thirsty. On the other hand, if you have been outside all day with no fluids and are feeling chest pains and vomiting, then you should seek help immediately.If you continue to vomit for longer than 24 hours then you should go to the emergency room right away.If you experience these symptoms, you may be suffering from extreme dehydration. It is vital you visit the emergency room as soon as possible to be treated. If you are experiencing these extreme symptoms, then Physicians Premier ER can help. Visit our locations page to find a location nearest to you:  https://mdpremier.com/locations/

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