Pressure Treated Wood Code Requirements at Home



Since window treatments are one of the only indoor fixtures that are partially visible from the street, you might be more than a little nervous about choosing the right blinds for your home. Fortunately, by knowing what to look for, you can streamline your shopping experience. Here are four things you should consider before investing in new blinds for your home.

Desired Light Level

One of the first things you will need to decide when you shop for blinds is the desired level of light inside of your place. While some people like blinds or shutters that let the light pour in, others like window treatments that block the harsh rays of the sun.

Keep in mind that larger slats will let more light in, while smaller slats create more of an ambient glow inside of your home. Additionally, some blinds are better behind things like curtains, so if you intend to hang some, ask the window treatment professionals you work with which ones would be best.

Your Energy Bill

In addition to filtering the light into your home, blinds can also be a powerful source of energy savings. Since some blinds are made of solid wood and others are created to provide insulating pockets of air against the window, the blinds you choose could help you to cut down on your monthly power bill.

In fact, honeycomb blinds have been shown to shield as much as 62%  of heat transfer, keeping carefully heated air indoors during the winter and heat-generating UV light outside during the summer. If energy savings is a priority for you, look for window treatments with blackout technology or a high R-Value.

Décor Aesthetic

Unfortunately, even the most energy efficient blinds might cause buyer’s remorse if you can’t stand to look at them. Before you head to the window treatment store, think carefully about your home décor and design aesthetic. As you shop, look for blinds that would meld with your style.

For example, if you have a clean, modern home, honeycomb shades might lend a gentle touch to the windows, while large, wooden slats may throw off the look of your home. To make the shopping process easier, take note of the materials used throughout the rest of your home, including hardware, crown molding, and trim.

Consider matching materials and color shades if you can to make your blinds blend in. For instance, if you have white trim and crown molding throughout your home, white wooden blinds might be the perfect addition.

Your Cleaning Commitment

Those newly installed blinds might look gorgeous now, but after a few months, you might be faced with a serious Saturday cleaning project on your hands. Over time, dust and debris build up on window treatments, and kids with sticky hands and curious fingers can make a mess of your blinds fast.

When you shop for blinds, think carefully about your personal commitment to cleaning, and what you are willing to do when it comes to your blinds. Keep in mind that some blinds have special cleaning needs because they are made from porous materials like wood.

After you have an idea of what you are willing to do when it comes to your blinds, look for window treatments that match your level of commitment. For example, if you have a busy lifestyle and a packed schedule, consider picking blinds that are easy to wipe down in a hurry. On the other hand, if you like a more formal look and have the time to handle more in-depth deep cleanings, shop to your heart’s content without worry.

When you have an idea of the blinds you want for your home, visit Lyons Lumber Co.
In addition to carrying a wide array of building materials including premium lumber, fasteners, and shingles, this friendly hardware store also offers a massive selection of high-end paints, window treatments, hand tools, cleaning supplies, and light fixtures.

FAQs

Should I use treated or untreated wood?

Pressure treated lumber is no stronger than untreated lumber. The difference between the two is that pressure treated lumber will resist the elements better than untreated due to chemical preservatives added, and so will maintain its integrity in conditions that would cause normal wood to rot.

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Do I need to use treated wood outside?

It is necessary but not compulsory to use pressure-treated wood for all outdoor projects. The treatment is only necessary for wood types that are not naturally resilient against insects and water damage

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What is the purpose of treated lumber?

Pressure-treated wood is wood that has been treated with chemicals that protect the wood from rot and insects. Wood structures that see constant exposure to the elements are prone to rot from moisture and insect damage

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Can you use treated lumber with untreated?

Yet, if you need something to last a long time and you know people won’t come into much contact with it, treated lumber might be the better choice. In general, though, treated lumber shouldn’t be used where untreated lumber will suffice

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How long will untreated wood last outside?

Untreated redwood, depending on it’s age, has a projected life span of 50 years or more when exposed to the elements. Pine varieties have a projected life span of only 5 to 10 years.

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What happens if you use untreated wood outside?

Untreated Wood

Left in their natural, unfinished state, most woods deteriorate quickly when exposed to outdoor environments. However, there are several species that have naturally occurring chemicals that help them shrug off harsh weather and insects.

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How long will pressure treated wood last?

How Long Does Pressure-Treated Wood Last? It depends on the climate, the type of wood, its uses, and how well it’s maintained. While pressure treated poles can stay up to 40 years without any signs of rot or decay, decks and flooring might only last around 10 years.

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Can you use regular 2×4 outside?

The only way to properly use untreated wood of any type outside is with the addition of water-repellent preservatives, sealer or paint that contain UV protection.

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Do you need to seal pressure treated wood?

Although treated wood is protected against decay and termite attack, the application of a water-repellent sealer to all exposed wood surfaces is recommended upon completion of construction. This sealer will help control surface checking (splitting or cracking) and provide an attractive appearance.

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How long will a treated 4×4 post last in the ground?

A treated 4×4 will last 20 to 25 years in the ground if the conditions in the soil and climate are favorable. That number could increase to 40 to 75 years if you install the treated 4×4 in a cement ring rather than the soil. There are a few factors that influence how long the 4×4 can last in the ground.

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Can untreated lumber get rained on?

Normal rainwater will not harm the wood that is used to build homes. Many homeowners fear that wood will immediately rot if allowed to get wet. That’s simply not the case. The only thing that doesn’t fare well if it gets wet is low-grade OSB.

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What happens if you don’t seal pressure treated wood?

Without stain, any type of paint or sealant, rainwater, dew or snow can easily penetrate the decking. The wood will then swell until it dries when it will shrink again. This pattern of swelling and shrinking can cause damage to the wood such as splits, checks, splinters, cracks, and other blemishes.

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How long will treated wood last outside?

While pressure treated poles can stay up to 40 years without any signs of rot or decay, decks and flooring might only last around 10 years.

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How long should I wait to seal pressure treated wood?

Following construction, most manufacturers of stains and paints recommend a waiting period ? from a week to two months ? before applying a finish to treated wood, if the project was built with lumber that was not kiln-dried after treatment (KDAT).

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When To Use Pressure Treated Lumber And When To Avoid It

When To Use Pressure Treated Lumber And When To Avoid It Since window treatments are one of the only indoor fixtures that are partially visible from the street, you might be more than a little nervous about choosing the right blinds for your home. Fortunately, by knowing what to look for, you can streamline your shopping experience. Here are four things you should consider before investing in new blinds for your home. Desired Light Level One of the first things you will need to decide when you shop for blinds is the desired level of light inside of your place. While some people like blinds or shutters that let the light pour in, others like window treatments that block the harsh rays of the sun. Keep in mind that larger slats will let more light in, while smaller slats create more of an ambient glow inside of your home. Additionally, some blinds are better behind things like curtains, so if you intend to hang some, ask the window treatment professionals you work with which ones would be best. Your Energy Bill In addition to filtering the light into your home, blinds can also be a powerful source of energy savings. Since some blinds are made of solid wood and others are created to provide insulating pockets of air against the window, the blinds you choose could help you to cut down on your monthly power bill. In fact, honeycomb blinds have been shown to shield as much as 62%  of heat transfer, keeping carefully heated air indoors during the winter and heat-generating UV light outside during the summer. If energy savings is a priority for you, look for window treatments with blackout technology or a high R-Value. Décor Aesthetic Unfortunately, even the most energy efficient blinds might cause buyer’s remorse if you can’t stand to look at them. Before you head to the window treatment store, think carefully about your home décor and design aesthetic. As you shop, look for blinds that would meld with your style. For example, if you have a clean, modern home, honeycomb shades might lend a gentle touch to the windows, while large, wooden slats may throw off the look of your home. To make the shopping process easier, take note of the materials used throughout the rest of your home, including hardware, crown molding, and trim. Consider matching materials and color shades if you can to make your blinds blend in. For instance, if you have white trim and crown molding throughout your home, white wooden blinds might be the perfect addition. Your Cleaning Commitment Those newly installed blinds might look gorgeous now, but after a few months, you might be faced with a serious Saturday cleaning project on your hands. Over time, dust and debris build up on window treatments, and kids with sticky hands and curious fingers can make a mess of your blinds fast. When you shop for blinds, think carefully about your personal commitment to cleaning, and what you are willing to do when it comes to your blinds. Keep in mind that some blinds have special cleaning needs because they are made from porous materials like wood. After you have an idea of what you are willing…

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7 Important Things to Know About Pressure-Treated Wood

7 Important Things to Know About Pressure-Treated WoodUneasy about using treated lumber for your outdoor projects? Learning a few important facts about this type of wood will help you use it wisely.By Tom Scalisi | Published Sep 10, 2021 5:05 PM

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When is using untreated lumber better? | HowStuffWorks

When is using untreated lumber better? ­The first step in building anything is choosing the right materials. If your project involves wood, you’re going to have to decide between treated and untreated lumber. So what’s the difference between the two? And at the end of the day, does it even matter? The short answer is yes, it matters — especially if you happen to be building a playground set for your kids or a garden bed for your vegetables. You might be surprised to learn that many forms of treated lumb­er can be harmful to your health. In the past, the treatment process involved filling wood with dangerous chemicals and chemical compounds like creosote, pentachlorophenol (PCP), and chromated copper arsenate (CCA) [source: Gegner]. None of these chemicals and chemical compounds are safe. In fact, the arsenate in CCA is a form of arsenic, which is a carcinogen known to cause many different types of cancer and even death [source: EPA]. ­Despite the dangers associated with arsenic, CCA treated lumber was the most common in the United States until manufacturers reached an agreement to stop producing it after 2003 [source: Williams]. Unfortunately, for many years, buildings and products were made using CCA treated lumber and they now pose health risks to those who come in regular contact with them. While new techniques for treating lumber have been deemed safer, they still require precautionary measures. You’ll find labels printed on treated wood warning those who are using it to wear masks and protect their skin [source: Austin]. It’s also important not to let any type of treated wood come in contact with drinking water. So if you want to know when it’s better to use untreated lumber, the answer is almost always. The debate is still out on whether or not there are any instances in which using treated lumber can be considered completely safe but many builders still swear by its advantages. Advantages of Untreated Lumber The obvious advantage of using untreated lumber is that there are no health risks involved. It’s as close to wood in it­s natural form as you’re going to get without grabbing an axe and chopping down your own tree. If you’re building anything that people will regularly be coming in contact with — such as playground equipment, lawn furniture or benches — you should always use untreated wood [source: Houlihan and Wiles]. Untreated lumber should also be used when you’re dealing with gardening, whether you’re building a raised garden bed, a flowerpot, or just making mulch. Some of the chemicals used to treat wood are meant to kill insects, which means they probably won’t do wonders for your soil either. They can damage your flowers and make their way into your vegetable gardens — ruining your prized tomatoes. An obvious advantage of untreated lumber is its price; it’s much cheaper than treated lumber. Since CCA-treated lumber was taken off the market, new treatment techniques use high levels of copper, which is more expensive. As a result, the cost of treated wood has risen considerably [source: Morrison]. When working with untreated wood, you don’t have to worry about protecting your skin. You may want to wear a mask to keep from breathing in sawdust, but you can work in short sleeves and/or shorts without any fear of endangering yourself. The same can’t be said for treated wood. In fact, when working with treated lumber, you should be adequately covered — long sleeves, long pants and eye goggles are all a good idea. Afterward, make sure to clean any sawdust from you or your clothing thoroughly. And, of course, you want to avoid breathing in any sawdust particles from treated lumber [source: McClintock]. At a minimum, you should wear a dust mask/facemask while working with treated lumber. And, if you have one, a respirator would be even better. At the end of the day, the ease of mind that…

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Pressure Treated Wood Code Requirements at Home

Pressure Treated Wood Code Requirements at Home Even though wood is a product of nature, structural wood and outdoor elements do not mix well. Stroll through any forest and it is evident how nature can make short work of massive fallen timber. Insects, UV rays, fungi, and moisture all conspire to turn that once-proud column of wood first into a hollowed-out log, and then into wood chips. What is expected in the forest is not beneficial when it comes to your deck, basement exterior wall, or retaining wall. One easy way to avoid rot is to avoid wood altogether: build with non-organic materials such as metal, CMU blocks, and masonry retaining wall blocks. But if you want wood, then choose pressure-treated wood, preservative-treated wood, or naturally durable wood. Some Places Where Decay-Resistant Wood Is Required Against basement masonry wallsSleepers or sill on top of concrete floorsVertical posts or columns resting in or on concreteDirect contact with the earthRetaining wallsSome house siding elementsSome subflooringSome joists At the home center, pressure-treated wood can usually be identified by its numerous incision marks. It is easy to imagine that the copper azole, type C, preservative has been injected into the wood at those points. Actually, the incisions help open the wood and allow the preservative to be forced into the wood cells under high pressure in massive metal tubes nearly half the length of a football field. While pressure-treated wood is twice or even three times more expensive than conventional kiln-dried lumber, your gain is the peace of mind in knowing that your project will not be affected by moisture or pests such as termites or carpenter ants. Building code requires pressure-treated wood in numerous applications. Following are selected instances where you might be required by code to use pressure-treated wood for your home remodeling projects. Basement Masonry Walls Perry Mastrovito Design Pics/Getty Images Pressure-treated wood is required whenever you attach framing lumber or furring strips directly to concrete or other exterior masonry walls below grade. Note that this requirement is only for exterior walls, as these may wick moisture onto the lumber. Interior walls are within a climate-controlled environment and are presumed to be free of moisture. This requirement is especially relevant to basement finishing. Bypassing this code requirement can lead to the basement wall members soaking up moisture. Because basement walls are hidden behind drywall or other wall covering materials, the wall framing members are not exposed to light and air. In a closed environment of this type, wood rot and devastating mold can quickly set in. Deterioration is eliminated entirely when you use metal studs against exterior walls. Basement finishing systems are another option as only metal and plastics are used for the walls. Wood on Concrete or Other Masonry David Papazian/Photographer’s Choice RF / Getty Images Concrete and other masonry, unless treated or otherwise coated, is highly porous. Water can pass through porous materials vertically via capillary action. When you have a vertical wood post or column resting on concrete or other masonry, and that concrete/masonry itself rests directly on the earth, then the post/column must be pressure-treated. Pressure-treated wood is not required if an impervious moisture barrier and a 1-inch metal or masonry pedestal separate the post from the earth by a total of 6 inches in basements or in weather-exposed locations. As with the requirement about basement masonry walls, this is meaningful in basement finishing applications, but this time with regards to structural support. Sleepers and sills of any nature…

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Pressure Treated Lumber: What It Is and When to Use It

Pressure Treated Lumber: What It Is and When to Use It Pressure-treated lumber has special preservatives that make it last longer. While these preservatives can vary, most enable the wood to better resist water damage, mold, and insect infestations.View in galleryBut this doesn’t mean pressure-treated lumber is always the best choice. Instead, you’ll want to use it for projects like decking, garden beds, or anywhere wood may come into contact with moisture.If you’re considering pressure-treated lumber for your project, here’s when and why to use it.View in galleryPressure-treated lumber is the result of adding chemical preservatives to wood using a high-pressure treatment. The injection of these preservatives protects the wood from rot, moisture damage, and insect infestations. It also adds decades to the wood’s lifespan.There are three main types of pressure-treated lumber: lumber for ground use, underground use, and marine use.The most common chemicals used to treat pressure-treated lumber are copper azole (CA), micronized copper azole (MCA), and copper quaternary (ACQ).Since pressure-treated lumber has liquids forced into it, it’s often wet when it arrives on-site and may take a couple of weeks to dry. Because of this, the boards you purchase at a home improvement store may experience slight shrinkage or warping.When to Use Pressure Treated Wood (And When Not To)When it comes to outdoor projects, there are a lot of uses for pressure-treated lumber. It’s one of the best decking and fence materials but works for other projects, too.Here’s when to use pressure-treated lumber:DecksFencesGarden bedsDocksWooden sidewalksFraming of outdoor structuresAnywhere outdoors, wood will come into contact with moistureSince pressure-treated wood has chemicals in it, you don’t want your food to touch it. So, if you’re using it on garden beds, line the beds with plastic first. Alternatively, you can use an oil-based sealant on the wood for a bit of added protection.And remember, the treated wood you pick up from a home improvement store is probably still wet. So if you plan on painting or staining it, allow it to fully dry beforehand.View in galleryIs It Okay to Use Pressure Treated Lumber Inside?Here’s the bad news: pressure-treated wood can possibly leach chemicals into its environment. So even though today’s lumber is less toxic than in years past, its chemical treatment still poses a small risk when used indoors.There’s a bit of debate as to whether you should use it inside. Some builders advocate using pressure-treated lumber as bathroom subfloors or around interior surfaces with high condensation levels.If you do use it inside, the most important thing is to avoid using it on food-safe surfaces like a cutting board or countertops. Also, avoid using it anywhere pets may chew on it.Types of Pressure Treated LumberView in galleryWhen you visit a home improvement store like Lowes or Home Depot, you’ll find different types of pressure-treated wood: above-ground and ground contact.Above ground pressure treated wood is for applications in which the lumber will be at least six inches off the ground. You should only use it where maintaining and replacing it will be easy. It needs to be in a well-ventilated area.Ground contact pressure-treated lumber is twice as durable as above-ground pressure-treated wood. You can use it above ground or in direct contact…

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8 Advantages of Using Pressure Treated Lumber

8 Advantages of Using Pressure Treated LumberPosted on December 16th, 2015 by Aaron Presley Wood has been an invaluable building material for thousands of years, but in certain situations, it is prone to decay, limiting its usefulness for many applications. Environments that are prone to moisture, that encourage the growth of bacteria or fungi or that harbor wood-boring insects are especially challenging for natural wood products. While other building materials, such as rock, concrete, aluminum or steel, may be used in place of wood in many inhospitable environments, they tend to be much more expensive and difficult to work with. To combat the limitations of natural wood and make it suitable for use in more extreme environments, pressure treated lumber was developed. To create pressure treated lumber, intense pressure is used to force one of several different chemical compounds deep into the grain, providing protection from the elements, fungal growth, bacterial growth and pest infestation. As a building material, pressure treated lumber offers several unique advantages over natural wood lumber, as well as other building products. Below are eight different advantages for using pressure treated lumber as a building material for your next project. 1. Moisture Resistance Natural wood left in moist or wet environments will soften quickly, allowing fungus, bacteria and other microorganisms to take root, slowly decomposing the wood. Pressure treated lumber uses one of several chemical compounds based on copper, which is a natural biocide, protecting it from fungus and other microorganisms that cause wood to decay in moist environments. After treatment, the lumber can be used in a variety of applications, such as for decks that are constantly exposed to the elements, sill plates on potentially-moist concrete, or even as support posts for docks and piers, where the lumber will be constantly immersed. 2. Fungal Resistance Even with the slightest amount of moisture, many different types of fungus can attach themselves to wood and start to grow, sending their root structure deep into the wood to slowly decompose it. As the wood weakens, it can be preyed upon by other organisms, including insects and bacteria. Pressure treated lumber uses copper-based compounds, such as alkaline copper quaternary or copper azole, to prevent fungal growth. These are sometimes used in combination with other compounds that also provide insect resistance. The chemicals allow pressure treated lumber to be used in applications where it will be consistently moist, such as for buried posts or in basements. 3. Insect Resistance In many areas, insects like termites and carpenter ants pose a significant threat to any structure built with wood. The insects can easily bore through the lumber, weakening it and eventually causing dangerous structural problems, especially when the wood is exposed and moist. The copper compounds in pressure treated lumber provide protection from insect damage, and additional chemicals such as borate or, less frequently, arsenic compounds, can be added to further discourage insect activity. When pressure treated lumber is used effectively in the construction process, by placing it in areas prone to insect activity, it can also provide a barrier that protects the rest of the structure from insect damage, including untreated wood. Additionally, it can discourage other nuisance insects, such as cockroaches and spiders, from taking residence in the structure. 4. Fire Resistance One of the most dangerous threats to wood-based buildings is fire damage. By employing the same pressure-treating process that is used to inject insecticides and fungicides into the wood grain, fire-retardant chemicals can also be added to create pressure treated lumber that is resistant to fire damage. Flame retardant lumber can be used in applications where the risk of fire is increased, such as lifting-prone locations or near fireplaces. 5. Variety of Sizes Pressure treated lumber is available in a wide array of sizes for different applications. For building purposes, it comes in the standard dimensional lumber sizes, such as two by fours, two by sixes or two by tens. For posts, it is available in a variety of square cross-sections, such as four by four or six by size, as well as round cross-sections. It can also be used for building decks, docks or piers,? or for lighting posts or utility poles. It is…

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Uses for Treated Wood

treated wood uses | Treated Wood Renewability Wood is our only major renewable building product so you can feel good about using it in your building projects. It is an environmentally responsible choice because the trees used are plentiful and fast-growing. The forest industry plants more trees than are harvested each year on managed timberlands. That means that wood, as a renewable resource, will be around for generations. These forests keep reproducing this exceptional building product. Not only that, but wood requires less energy to produce than alternative building products and the preservatives for pressure-treated lumber are manufactured, in large part, from recycled materials. True Green Because of its environmental benefits, the USDA has recently recognized wood as a true “green” material in green building design. Viance’s very own Ecolife Stabilized Weather-Resistant Wood was also the first decking product of any kind to receive Green Certified Product recognition by the NAHB Home Innovation Research Labs as a NGBS Green Certified Product for Resource Efficiency. You can feel good about the environmentally responsible choice you have made when you choose treated wood for the construction of your deck because wood is our only major renewable building material. The trees used to make your treated wood are grown in managed forests and are plentiful and fast-growing. Moreover, treated wood requires less energy to produce than alternative building products, and recycled materials make up the bulk of the preservatives used in the manufacturing process. Beauty Many of the composite decking products on the market have surfaces that are embossed to “look” like real wood. However, that is not the reality because it is not real wood. There is only one product that gives us the natural beauty with all of its grains, knots and whirls and that is real wood. Whether it is stained, painted or left in its natural state, the beauty of real wood is hard to mimic. Appearance Treated wood retains its characteristic wood appearance, whereas composite decking may fade and scratch; and in just a few years, the appearance of your composite deck surface may not be what you expected. On the other hand, with effective refinishing, treated wood decking can regain its original look even after years of frequent use, provided there is the right attention to detail and care. Treated wood can also be found a variety of lumber grades making it a very versatile building product when you want to add variety to the appearance of your deck. It can be found in forms from knot-free, close-grained grades to grades that contain more knots and splits or even more wane, which is where there are missing corners where bark once existed. Pressure treating lumber has little effect on its appearance other than giving it a slightly greenish or brownish hue from the treatment process which makes the wood last longer regardless of its appearance. Easy to Use When using pressure-treated lumber, there are no special skills, special safety requirements or specialized tools required. It is easy to cut and install. In building, you can’t get much simpler than…

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A Thorough Guide to All Things Treated Lumber

A Thorough Guide to All Things Treated Lumber What is treated lumber? Is all treated lumber created equally? Which type should be used where? Learn the answers to these questions and more. 1 / 12 Construction Pro Tips What is Treated Wood? Like its name suggests, pressure-treated wood is wood that has been treated with chemicals while under pressure. Most treated wood is pressure-treated, but wood can also be surface coated. Surface coated means that the application of the preservative chemical is introduced by dipping, brushing or spraying the wood without being exposed to pressure. This is common when it’s necessary to treat the lumber or building components after they are installed. 2 / 12 joebrandt/Getty Images Types of Treated Wood There are two types of treated wood: preservative-treated wood and pressure-preservative-treated wood (pressure treated lumber). Wood treatment chemicals delay deterioration caused by fungi (rot) and make wood less appealing to potentially destructive insects. One common misconception is that treated wood is more resistant to water, but that’s not true. Treated wood will soak up just as much water as non-treated wood. 3 / 12 Mark Hunt/Getty Images What is Treated Wood Used for Treated wood is used for areas where the lumber will be susceptible to moisture, like uncovered areas outdoors. It is not for internal use. Moisture can cause serious issues to untreated wood, like warping. 4 / 12 Courtesy SWPA How is Pressure-Treated Wood Created? First, untreated lumber is placed into a large horizontal treating cylinder. The door is sealed and a vacuum is applied to remove most of the air from both the cylinder and the cells of the wood in the process. A preservative solution is then pumped into the cylinder and the created pressure forces the preservative solution into the empty wood cells, and then you have pressure treated lumber. 5 / 12 Why Does Pressure Treated Lumber Warp? Most dimensional lumber is dried in a kiln, but treated wood is not dried after treatment. There are exceptions to this, such as foundation grade lumber and plywood, which needs to be dried to a moisture content of no more than 19 percent for lumber and 15 percent for plywood. This is referred to as Kiln Dried After Treatment (KDAT). Wood does most of its warping, twisting, and cupping as it dries. It’s hard to determine if you’re getting a straight board when it’s still wet. 6 / 12 Can I Make Wood Treatment Chemicals? There’s a very easy, straight answer to that question… no! The American Lumber Standards Committee (ALSC) Treated Wood Program, operating under the Board of Review, currently has accredited independent third-party agencies in the United States and Canada that regulate this industry.  Monitoring of treating plant production takes place under standards written and maintained by the American Wood Protection Association (AWPA) and ALSC policies. In addition to that, all treated wood chemicals are regulated by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as pesticides, and all pesticides sold or distributed in the United States must be registered by the EPA. With all of that regulation it is unlikely your local building official will accept “home-made” treated lumber. 7 / 12 Who Makes the Treated Lumber Rules? The American Wood Protection Association (AWPA) is responsible for spreading voluntary wood preservation standards. AWPA standards are referenced in both the International Residential Code (IRC) and the International Building Code (IBC). The Use Category System (UCS) designates what preservative systems and retentions have been determined to be effective in protecting wood products under specified exposure conditions. All wood products can be placed into one of five major Use Categories that clearly describe the exposure conditions that specified wood products can be subjected to in service. These are further broken down into sub-categories to define the associated degree of biodegradation hazard and product service life expectations. Below is a brief chart showing some of the usage sub-categories…

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