Bulb Planting – Denny McKeown’s Bloomin Garden Centre



large, sprouting tulip bulbs

Tulips are a favorite springtime flower for many gardeners. Knowing when to plant the bulbs in your particular growing climate is a key element for a beautiful bloom each spring.

Appropriate Climates for Hardy Bulbs

There are two types of flower bulbs, tender and hardy. Tulip bulbs are considered hardy, meaning they require a period of cold weather in order to properly break their dormancy and resume growth. Tender bulbs are unable to tolerate cold weather and must be stored indoors until warmer temperatures resume.

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Hardy bulbs such as tulips can be left in the ground during the winter months or planted in the fall in cool to cold climate growing zones one to seven. The USDA Hardiness Growing Zone map for North America has 11 different growing zones. Growing zones higher than a seven will most likely require hardy bulbs to be stored in a refrigerator for the appropriate number of weeks needed until they can be planted to resume their natural growing cycle.

Ohio’s Growing Zones

According to Cleveland.com, the 2012 update of hardiness zones puts Ohio in growing zones 6B, 6A, and 5B. Expert gardener P. Allen Smith, who hosts his own gardening show on public television, suggests the best time for planting tulip bulbs in the moderate climate zones of four through seven (where Ohio falls) is any time from September through November. The bulbs should be planted soon after being purchased in order for a strong root system to develop before the winter frost arrives.

How to Plant Tulip Bulbs

Proper planting techniques for tulip bulbs are another key element for a successful spring bloom. Use the following tips to make sure your bulbs have the best chance of flowering. Large, firm bulbs are the best, although they will vary in size naturally.

tulip bed
Dig an area instead of individual holes.
  • Plant the tulip bulbs at a depth that is at least three times their height.
  • Instead of individual holes, dig out an entire area, deep enough for the largest bulb. Make small mounds for the smaller bulbs, to ensure all are planted at the proper depth.
  • Always plant the bulbs with the fat end down and the tapered end up.
  • If you find a bulb that you can’t tell the fat end from the tapered end, plant it sideways.
  • Plant the bulbs randomly instead of in straight rows. This will help you avoid having a hole in the row if a bulb fails to grow and also has a more natural appearance.
  • Plant a few different types of tulips for a longer blooming season.
  • Choose an area with plenty of sun exposure. Partial shade will also work, however, the bulbs planted in areas with full sun exposure will grow faster and bloom first.
  • Top off the soil with mulch, which should be factored into the planting depth.
  • Don’t forget to water the area where you plant your bulbs.
  • You can also plant potted tulips in the fall.

Tips for Protecting Bulbs from Rodents

Tulip bulbs are a tasty treat for small furry creatures that live outside. However, you can protect your bulbs from these varmints with these helpful tips:

  • P. Allen Smith suggests using a piece of chicken wire cut one inch larger than the tulip bed. Bend the edges down to form a lid shape and place the chicken wire over the bulbs once they are covered with soil, pushing the edges into the soil. Then cover with mulch. Remove the chicken wire in the spring when the plant foliage begins to emerge.
  • Smith also suggests using synthetic bulb food instead of bone meal when planting, as rodents are attracted to bone meal.
  • Hardware cloth can also be laid over the planting area before covering with soil.
  • Dip the bulbs in a rodent repellent such as Bobbex-R.

Planting Tulips in Ohio

pink tulips

Although there is about a three-month span of planting time in the fall for tulip bulbs in Ohio, you should pay attention to weather patterns each year and adjust your planting time accordingly. If it has been an unusually cool summer or weather experts are predicting an early frost, plant your bulbs in early to mid- September.

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FAQs

What is the best month to plant daffodil bulbs?

fall

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When should you plant bulbs in Ohio?

Many of these varieties are popular in Ohio because they are hardy and do well over a cold winter. A good rule of thumb is to pant your bulbs about 6 weeks before the soil in your region freezes, usually late September or early October

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When should tulip bulbs be planted in Ohio?

Expert gardener P. Allen Smith, who hosts his own gardening show on public television, suggests the best time for planting tulip bulbs in the moderate climate zones of four through seven (where Ohio falls) is any time from September through November.

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Is it OK to plant daffodil bulbs in April?

But as long as the ground is workable, you can plant bulbs! This means that you can plant bulbs as late as January ? if you can dig a hole deep enough to plant. Plant tulips and daffodils as late as the end of January! This way, they’ll develop roots through the spring, and bloom later than usual

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Can I plant daffodils in March?

After the first frost or snow storm, you might assume that your bulb-planting days are over. But as long as the ground is workable, you can plant bulbs! This means that you can plant bulbs as late as January ? if you can dig a hole deep enough to plant. Plant tulips and daffodils as late as the end of January!

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Do daffodils multiply?

How do daffodils multiply? Daffodils multiply in two ways: asexual cloning (bulb division) where exact copies of the flower will result, and sexually (from seed) where new, different flowers will result. Seeds develop in the seed pod (ovary), the swelling just behind the flower petals.

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Can you plant bulbs in March in Ohio?

The best time to plant bulbs is September through October because the bulbs ? especially daffodils — need time to root well before the ground freezes.

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Can you plant bulbs in March?

When planting in March, it’s best to wait until you believe that the last frost is over. The vast majority of the bulbs that bloom in the late summer require sunshine, but make sure to check the instructions for the species that you purchased. Mix in compost and bulb food with the existing soil in your garden bed.

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Can I plant tulips in March?

Planting Tulips in Spring

If the bulbs have lasted through the winter, have some weight to them, aren’t dry and crumbly, or soft and mushy, the good news is yes, tulip bulbs can still be planted in early spring just as soon as the ground is workable. It’s worth a shot to try anyway and not waste your money!

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Is it too late to plant daffodil bulbs in March?

Q How late can I plant daffodils? A The best results for early flowering Narcissus ‘Tête-à-tête’ came from planting in early October, producing plants that spent four weeks in full flower in March. But we still got good results with bulbs planted as late as December, although the time spent in full flower was halved.

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What happens if I plant daffodils in the spring?

The roots will then be able to supply the tops with water and nutrients from the soil. Waiting until spring to plant the bulbs will not satisfy these requirements, so spring-planted bulbs will likely not bloom this year. Saving the bulbs for planting next fall is not a wise choice either.

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Do daffodils spread?

For the most part, daffodils spread fairly and do not tend to overpower other plants. While you may end up with more daffodils than you want to keep, finding new homes for healthy daffodil bulbs is usually pretty easy. You might also sell or trade them at local farmer’s markets or with your garden club members.

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Can I plant daffodils in February?

Even if you find an unplanted sack of tulips or daffodils in January or February, plant them and take your chances. No matter what, they’re better off giving it a fighting chance in the ground or a chilled pot than wasting away in the garage or cupboard.

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How many daffodil bulbs do you plant together?

When growing daffodils, you should plant them in groups of ten or more. All you do is make a loose circle with about seven bulbs and put three in the middle. For aesthetic reasons, you don’t want to mix different cultivars within each planting group.

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How many daffodils do you get out of one bulb?

Most daffodil bulbs will produce one to three stems the first spring after planting. Over time, the bulbs will divide and multiply, giving you more stems and more flowers, for an ever more impressive show of color.

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Bulb Planting – Denny McKeown's Bloomin Garden Centre

Bulb Planting – Denny McKeown’s Bloomin Garden Centre When to Plant For cold hardy bulbs like tulips, daffodils, and hyacinths, plant new bulbs in the fall. The best months to fall plant are October and November. By this time, a lot of our seasonal color has dwindled and we don’t feel bad pulling out annuals to plant our spring flowering bulbs. These months also provide a better chance for soil moisture from rain that makes our digging easier. Where to Plant All spring flowering bulbs want sunny locations. Remember, early flowering bulbs like snow drops, crocus, daffodils, and early tulips bloom before the leaves some on the trees. That means you can plant these and other early flowering bulbs under shade trees which will allow these bulbs to grow and bloom before any shade sets it. How to Plant Bulbs can be planted in rows like soldiers or planted five to seven bulbs to a hole which is called bouquet planting. I prefer the latter. To me, it looks more natural and you have space in between those clusters to plant other plants that will help camouflage the leaves of the bulbs after they finish blooming. Most tulips, daffodils, and other bulbs bloom from 1-2 weeks. You can double the time of each variety by digging your hole as deep as the variety should be and adding 2 inches. Plant 4 of your bulbs in the bottom of the hole. Add 2 inches of soil and plant 3 more. The shallower bulbs will bloom first and the deeper ones will bloom through the others starting a week later. This type of piggyback planting will double your bloom time. You can also use different colors. This will drive your neighbor’s nuts when they think your daffodils were white one week and yellow the next. Dividing Bulbs The best time to divide your cold hardy bulbs is in the spring as the leaves start to dwindle, approximately 6 weeks after flowering. The spent leaves will have matured after blooming. Carefully dig down around the outside of the buried bulbs with a shovel or gardening fork and lift up the bulbs. Remove any dried leaves still attached. Also remove any smaller attached bulbs (called bulblets). You can now relocate the freshly dug bulbs and, if you like, plant the smaller bulblets to the new growing area you’ve assigned them. The smaller bublets will probably not bloom the next 2 years, but eventually, they will. Some gardeners will tell you to wait until fall to replant your dug-up bulbs, but don’t listen, you’ll wind up forgetting about them after football starts in August and finally find them next spring looking for that misplaced paint brush. Forcing Bulbs Indoors Nothing can be more spring inspiring than a pot of blooming tulips or daffodils on our coffee table in the dead of winter. Sound difficult? Not really. You can force narcissus, tulips, hyacinths, and crocus to bloom indoors. Purchase the bulbs in the fall along with some bulb pots and loamy potting soil. Pot up crocus leaving the…

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When to Plant Daffodil Bulbs in Ohio – GFL Outdoors

When to Plant Daffodil Bulbs in Ohio In gardening, timing is everything, especially with regard to when to plant daffodil bulbs in Ohio. There’s general information you need to know when it comes to when and how, as well as plenty of specifics. When we’re done, you’ll know everything you need to get started and experience the wonder of seeing your first daffodils pop out of the ground in the spring. Let’s look at when to plant daffodil bulbs in Ohio! The Basics Daffodil bulbs can be accurately described as cold, hardy bulbs, which means the planting season in Ohio starts in the fall. October and November are considered the best months, but technically you can plant as late as January and still have success, and you can actually plant after the first frost or snowstorm and get good results. A good rule of thumb is to plant approximately six weeks before the soil freezes, so keep that in mind if the summer-to-fall transition is uneven. There are issues that come with planting too early or too late. Planting daffodil bulbs too early makes them susceptible to rot, and if you put them in during the late summer weeks they can actually be tricked into trying to bloom too early. If you do end up planting daffodil bulbs in the late winter, the advantage is an equally late bloom. That means you can enjoy the pleasure of seeing your daffodils bloom when most of the other early bloomers have come and gone. While they’re flowering, yours will still be developing roots, and the only tangible disadvantage associated with a late bloom is that your bloom may be smaller. Planting Specifics The first question many would-be gardeners ask when it comes to daffodils is how many to plant. The general rule is to plant in double figures, i.e., ten or more, with three in the middle and the other seven surrounding them in a loose circle. If you have more space and you’re so inclined, you can go for a larger group, but it’s generally not considered a idea to mix in other cultivars in with a planting group, so keep that in mind as you lay out your garden. Daffodils tend to look better in formal groups, but if you want to get fancy you experiment with different design patterns when you plant your bulbs. The bulbs should be planted with the pointed end up, which of course means that fat end will be down. To get the digging right, measure the length of the bulb from the pointed end to the tail, then dig twice that distance when you go to plant. For a better idea of how this works, let’s spell out a specific example. If your bulb measures out a 2 inches from top to bottom, you’ll want to dig down four inches below the soil level. Why go that deep? A deeper planting helps protect the bulbs from issues like frost heaves, and it can also protect them from damage from different gardening tools like spades and rakes. You don’t have to measure the hole down to the last millimeter, but going deep will increase your chances of success by a lot. Soil issues play a role in this, too. If you’ve got sandy soil, plant the bulbs more deeply. For heavier soils—e.g., clay—you may want to consider a shallower plant. Part of this depends on your knowledge of your property and the soil, so be your own expert. When you’re done planting, cover the bulbs with soil, then water them well—there’s no need to soak them before you plant. You can also use mulch to protect them if they’re in a vulnerable area or section of your garden, and chopped leaves will fit the bill if you’d prefer not to mulch. One of the best things about planting daffodil bulbs is that they’re easy to grow, so your chances of long-term success are good as well. If you’ve got good soil drainage and your garden is getting the right amount of sun, you can leave the bulbs in the ground, and they’ll likely bloom year after year. Even better, daffodils have been known to…

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When Is the Best Time to Plant Tulips in Ohio? | LoveToKnow

When Is the Best Time to Plant Tulips in Ohio? | LoveToKnow Home & GardenGardenAll About Bulbs Tulips are a favorite springtime flower for many gardeners. Knowing when to plant the bulbs in your particular growing climate is a key element for a beautiful bloom each spring. Appropriate Climates for Hardy Bulbs There are two types of flower bulbs, tender and hardy. Tulip bulbs are considered hardy, meaning they require a period of cold weather in order to properly break their dormancy and resume growth. Tender bulbs are unable to tolerate cold weather and must be stored indoors until warmer temperatures resume. Related Articles How Deep to Plant Tulip Bulbs for Your Healthiest Flowers How to Plant and Care for Potted Tulips Are Tulips Perennials? How to Help Them Come Back Hardy bulbs such as tulips can be left in the ground during the winter months or planted in the fall in cool to cold climate growing zones one to seven. The USDA Hardiness Growing Zone map for North America has 11 different growing zones. Growing zones higher than a seven will most likely require hardy bulbs to be stored in a refrigerator for the appropriate number of weeks needed until they can be planted to resume their natural growing cycle. Ohio’s Growing Zones According to Cleveland.com, the 2012 update of hardiness zones puts Ohio in growing zones 6B, 6A, and 5B. Expert gardener P. Allen Smith, who hosts his own gardening show on public television, suggests the best time for planting tulip bulbs in the moderate climate zones of four through seven (where Ohio falls) is any time from September through November. The bulbs should be planted soon after being purchased in order for a strong root system to develop before the winter frost arrives. How to Plant Tulip Bulbs Proper planting techniques for tulip bulbs are another key element for a successful spring bloom. Use the following tips to make sure your bulbs have the best chance of flowering. Large, firm bulbs are the best, although they will vary in size naturally. Dig an area instead of individual holes. Plant the tulip bulbs at a depth that is at least three times their height. Instead of individual holes, dig out an entire area, deep enough for the largest bulb. Make small mounds for the smaller bulbs, to ensure all are planted at the proper depth. Always plant the bulbs with the fat end down and the tapered end up. If you find a bulb that you can’t tell the fat end from the tapered end, plant it sideways. Plant the bulbs randomly instead of in straight rows. This will help you avoid having a hole in the row if a bulb fails to grow and also has a more natural appearance. Plant a few different types of tulips for a longer blooming season. Choose an area with plenty of sun exposure. Partial shade will also work, however, the bulbs planted in areas with full sun exposure will grow faster and bloom first. Top off the soil with mulch, which should be factored into the planting depth. Don’t forget to water the area where you plant your bulbs. You can also plant potted tulips in the fall. Tips for Protecting Bulbs from Rodents Tulip bulbs are a tasty treat for small furry creatures that live outside. However, you can protect your bulbs from these varmints with these helpful tips: P. Allen Smith suggests using a piece of chicken wire cut one inch larger than the tulip bed. Bend the edges down to form a lid shape and place the chicken wire over the bulbs once they are covered with soil, pushing the edges into the soil. Then cover with mulch. Remove the chicken wire…

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Plant Spring Bulbs in the Fall – Five Seasons Landscape

Plant Spring Bulbs in the Fall – Five Seasons Landscape Ever wonder why you plant bulbs in the fall and they don’t bloom until spring? The reason is because the bulbs are actually dormant when you buy them, and the cold winter temperatures break their dormancy. The bulb stores food for the plant so that it has the necessary nutrients to grow and begin to bloom in the springtime. Whether you live in Columbus, Ohio, or another part of the U.S., here is some info to help make fall planting a success. For additional info, check out our article on Fall Planting in Columbus! Popular spring flowers that start as bulbs include: Hyacinths Daffodils Tulips Amaryllis Crocus Lilies Many of these varieties are popular in Ohio because they are hardy and do well over a cold winter. When to Plant Flowering Bulbs A good rule of thumb is to pant your bulbs about 6 weeks before the soil in your region freezes, usually late September or early October. If in doubt, earlier is better so that the root systems have time to develop before it gets really cold. If you plant your bulbs too late, the plants may bloom later in the season. Simple Steps for Bulb Planting: When purchasing flowering bulbs, select big fat healthy ones and avoid any that appear dry, withered or moldy. Work bulb fertilizer into the surrounding soil after you dig your hole. Plant bulbs pointed side up because that is the stem of the plant and it will grow easier. Water well after planting, and again if you have a dry fall. How Deep to Plant Flowering Bulbs Consider the size of the bulb and use a garden spade to dig a hole that is about three times as deep as the bulb’s diameter. Planting Bulbs in Groups For a more dramatic look or to get maximum flowers in small spaces, plant groups of bulbs together in one large hole. To create companion plantings, layer different types of bulbs from bottom to top, lightly covering each layer with soil. After the Bloom It’s best to let your plants die back on their own because they need time to create food reserves for next year. (It takes about two months for the flowers to fade.) Once your plants have finished flowering you can cut them back to ground level. If you want spring flowering bulbs planted this fall in Columbus, Ohio, whether for your home, business or rental property, contact the lawn care professionals at Five Seasons Landscape Management. Contact us. Now serving only COMMERCIAL clients. Please note that we no longer take on new residential customers.

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Plant Fall Bulbs to Light Up Your Spring – Petitti Garden Centers

Plant Fall Bulbs to Light Up Spring | Petitti Garden Centers fall is the time to plant spring-blooming bulbs Did you know fall is the time to plant spring-blooming bulbs? It’s true! Spring bloomers like daffodils, hyacinths, tulips, crocus, and more are best planted outdoors as dormant bulbs in the fall, and they’re one of the most rewarding efforts to make in the garden because they’re so reliable. Bulbs can be planted anytime before the ground freezes but, for best selection, it’s wise to shop for bulbs on the earlier side of the season. Read on for our best advice for planting fall bulbs and visit a Petitti Garden Center near you to shop our selection. We offer Netherland Bulbs, a premium grower whose Dutch bulb experts are on farms year-round in Holland, inspecting crops and ensuring that only the finest bulbs are shipped to Petitti’s in Northeast Ohio. choosing the best location Here in Northeast Ohio, the weather can still be pretty chilly in early spring as bulbs begin to emerge, keeping you indoors and away from your gardens. To make sure you can enjoy watching your bulbs grow whether up close or from a distance, indoors or out, think about planting in a spot that’s visible from a window. The location should also get sun for at least half the day. And remember, it’s no problem to plant bulbs under a deciduous tree that loses its leaves over winter because, by the time the tree leafs out, the bulbs will have already absorbed plenty of energy from the sun. how to do it best 3 tips for planting fall bulbs 1. Plant each bulb 3x as deep as the size/height of the bulb. For example, plant a 2″-tall bulb at a depth of 6 inches. Only plant bulbs that are firm and heavy, with intact papery skin. 2. Position the bulb in the hole with the “point” end up and the “fuzzy” end down. 3. For the best appearance and a stronger visual statement, dig a single hole 15″ wide and 6-8″ deep. Place multiple bulbs of the same type, or plant an assortment of bulbs with different bloom times in layers. Angelo recommends planting in groups of at least five to seven, and avoiding singles or rows. fall is the time to plant these cheerful garden charms Watch as Noelle demonstrates Angelo Petitti’s method of planting bulbs to achieve the best visual impact come spring. And she uses deer-resistant varieties! success products how to do it best Be sure add Bulb-tone® and Bone Meal fertilizer to the hole at the time of planting. When backfilling with soil, cover them up with a couple inches of Soil Perfector® to keep the soil loose and protect against hungry rodents. You can also sprinkle Repels-All® to prevent animals from snacking on the bulbs. Consider the use of helpful tools like the Garden Weasel® Bulb Planter and garden knee pads to make the work of gardening easy & comfy. Espoma® Bulb-tone® Espoma® Bone Meal Espoma® Soil Perfector® Bonide® Repels-All® selecting varieties that thrive in ohio All fall-planted bulb varieties available at Petitti’s will thrive in Northeast Ohio’s climate. The most popular types are crocus, daffodils, tulips, and hyacinths. Paperwhite narcissus and amaryllis are also great bulbs for…

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Fall bulbs: How to plant them like a pro (photos and video)

Fall bulbs: How to plant them like a proFall bulbs: How to plant them like a pro (photos and video)Updated: Oct. 06, 2015, 4:00 p.m.Published: Oct. 06, 2015, 3:00 p.m.CHAGRIN FALLS — Planting bulbs is the smallest garden chore with the biggest bloomin’ payoff. Just dig a hole, drop in a bulb, cover it over and wait for spring.The only trick is that you must plant spring-blooming bulbs in fall, said Jeff Griff, owner of Lowe’s Greenhouse in Chagrin Falls. Bulbs must go through a cold period in order to flower; that’s why they are planted in fall.”Every spring, a ton of people come in and want to plant daffodil and tulip bulbs in April and May,” Griff said. “That’s just going to be too late. Now is the time to plan ahead and plant those bulbs for a wonderful spring display.”Add planting bulbs – daffodil, allium, crocus, tulip, daffodil, hyacinth and more – to your fall to-do list. Here are Griff’s tips about how to do it like a pro:If you don’t think you can grow bulbs because of deer problems, you can. Just stick to daffodils and allium, and avoid deer-favorites tulips.You can plant daffodil bulbs in sun or shade, although the flowers will keep blooming for more years in the sun. The bulbs will last about 3-4 years in shade, but will keep going for 5 years in sun if they are divided regularly.Dig down 3-4 times the size of the bulb. You may have to loosen the soil first in order to get down that far. When planting a large group of bulbs, it’s easier to dig out an entire area instead of doing one hole at a time.Resist the urge to plant them in rows. “They are much more impactful if they are planted in groups,” Griff said.If tulips or other bulbs are going to be seen from close up, it’s OK to plant just a handful of bulbs. But if the flower bed will be seen from far away, such as in a roadside bed, you need to plant more so they will make a visual impact.Feel free to mix tulips of different colors, or different kinds of daffodils. You can even mix bulbs that bloom at different times to expand the blooming season.Fertilize with bone meal, which will activate in the spring when your bulbs need a boost. Fertilize again in spring when leaves emerge. “It’s important to fertilize again,” Griff said.When blooms fade, don’t rip out the foliage immediately. Let daffodil leaves stand because they are providing food that the bulb will store for next winter. Let the daffodil leaves be until they turn brown. If they look unsightly, bend them over and secure with a rubber band.Here are some helpful links:Plant a bulb garden, from Lowe’sHow to plant spring bulbs, by Better Homes and GardensBulbs and more, from the University of Illinois ExtensionNote to readers: if you purchase something through one of our affiliate links we may earn a commission.

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How to Plant, Grow, and Care for Daffodil Flowers

Daffodils Botanical Name Narcissus spp. Daffodils are one of the earliest spring-blooming flowers! Find all our tips on planting daffodil bulbs, caring for daffodils, and what to do after they flower. About Daffodils Daffodils are a hardy and easy perennial that grows in most regions of North America, except in the hottest, wettest areas, such as South Florida. Daffodils are a fall-planted bulb, so plant them in autumn and they will bloom in late winter or early spring. (They are the March birth flower, after all!) The traditional daffodil flower may be a showy yellow or white, with six petals and a trumpet-shape central corona, but many cultivated varieties (“cultivars”) exist today. Leafless stems bear between 1 and 20 flowers; sometimes the flowers need to be staked so that they don’t weigh down the stems. Daffodils are suitable for planting between shrubs or in a border, or for forcing blooms indoors. They look wonderful in a woodland garden and in large groves. You’ll find that many gardeners plant the bulbs not just by the dozens but by the hundreds! Daffodil flowers also make for great springtime cut flowers. Planting When to Plant Daffodils Plant daffodil bulbs in the fall—about 2 to 4 weeks before the ground freezes. See local frost dates and get more tips on planting fall bulbs. Choosing and Preparing a Planting Site Select a site that offers full sun or partial sun, at the least. Daffodils will bloom best when given adequate exposure to early spring sunshine! Most daffodils tolerate a range of soils but grow best in moderately fertile, well-drained soil that is kept moist during the growing season. They are susceptible to rot when kept too wet, so make sure that you plant them in a well-draining spot. Many of the popular species prefer neutral to acidic soils, but some prefer slightly alkaline soils, so consult the supplier of your bulbs to see which is best for your daffodil variety. Over time, daffodils will produce new, “daughter” bulbs that are attached to the main bulb which you planted originally. This results in nice little clumps of daffodils that stay relatively contained to where you planted them. How to Plant Daffodils Select high-quality daffodil bulbs that have not been dried out. The larger the bulb, the better. Plant with the top or pointy end up about 2 to 3 times as as deep as the bulb is high. For example, the top of a 2″ bulb is at least 4″ deep (measuring from the bottom of the bulb) while a 3-inch long bulb should be planted 5 inches deep. Daffodils will tolerate some crowding, but they prefer to be spaced about 3 to 6 inches apart. It may help to sprinkle a little bulb fertilizer in the hole during planting. Learn more about preparing soil for planting. Where winters are severe, make sure there are at least 3 inches of soil covering the bulb. Resist the temptation to uncover spring-flowering plants such as daffodils and tulips. You can loosen mulch, but the shoots will still benefit from protection against cold, drying winds in early spring. Daffodils contain something called oxalic acid—a substance that makes them unpalatable to most rodent pests. However, if yours are being bothered, consider adding sharp sharp pieces of shells or a pelleted rodent deterrent into and around each planting hole. Get more tips for growing bulbs. Growing How to Grow Daffodils Apply a low-nitrogen, high-potash (potassium) fertilizer after flowering if bulbs are not performing as desired. Learn more about…

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Spring Flowering Bulbs | Dayton Nursery

Spring Flowering Bulbs | Dayton Nursery Spring flowering bulbs are an excellent way to provide color and variety to that late Winter through early summer landscape.  To get a great selection of bulbs, it’s best to make your purchases in September.  We then recommend that the bulbs be held for planting until early to late October when the soil temperatures are cooler. Location Tulips, daffodils and other bulbs require half to a full day of sun and well-drained soil.  They can be planted in landscape beds and perennial gardens, or they can be naturalized.  Naturalized plantings are deliberately placed so that they appear unplanned.  Bulbs can be planted under deciduous trees because they will make most of their growth before the tree’s leaves shade their location during the summer.  The roots of trees and shrubs will also help to keep the soil dry through summer. Selecting Bulbs Select the largest bulbs for the biggest and best flower production.  To elongate the flowering season, plant early, midseason and late season varieties of the same type of bulb or different bulbs that bloom at different times Planting First work Bone Meal or Bulb Booster into the soil where bulbs are to be planted.   Then, plant as directed:  larger bulbs such as tulips, daffodils and hyacinths should be planted 6-8″ deep and 6-8″ apart.  Minor bulbs such as crocus, snowdrops, anemones and others should be planted at least 4-5″ deep and 4″ apart.  Remember, the pointed side of the bulb always goes up. To simplify your bulb buying and planting calculations, use this handy chart to determine how many bulbs you need for a particular sized bed.  Of course, the quantity listed would depend on the effect you’re trying to achieve and your budget.   You can increase the number of bulbs for a dramatic and showy effect or decrease the number if you are mixing in other bulbs or to plant them further apart. Bulb 10 25 50 100 Anemone 200 500 1000 2000 Scilla 200 500 1000 2000 Muscari 200 500 1000 2000 Crocus 200 500 1000 2000 Large Daffodil 75 205 420 1100 Small Daffodil 140 340 675 1350 Large Tulip 65 180 360 725 Small Tulip 75 205 420 1110 Watering Water bulbs right after you plant them. If it is a dry fall, you will want to water bulb plantings about every 10 days through December. Spring Care After the bulbs flower, the foliage must remain intact until it browns naturally or the bulb will not be able to store enough energy to bloom next year.  A side dressing of bulb food just as the bulbs come up in spring is helpful Division Some bulbs such as daffodils and some tulip varieties will multiply rapidly.  As the bulbs multiply, the flower quality will diminish.  The bulbs can easily be divided by digging them up in mid-summer after the foliage has died, or in early fall.   The divided bulbs should be replanted as soon as possible. Diseases & Pests Some bulbs are the favorite snack of squirrels and moles.  There are some ways to control these bulbs bandits.  Plant daffodils around susceptible bulbs, as they are poisonous and are often avoided by wildlife.  Newly planted bulbs eaten by critters also can be soaked in Ropel Animal Repellent for about 10-20 seconds before planting.   Deer just love tulip and many other spring bulbs, just spray the emerging leaves with Liquid Fence when they’re about 2″ high in spring and again in about 10 day In very moist areas, fungus can be a problem.  This can be avoided by dusting bulbs with sulfur based fungicies following label directions.  Weed Control You may overspray bulb area with an herbicide to kill weeds in late summer as long as no part of the green tops remain.  DO NOT use Preen weed preventer as bulbs do not like it and will not thrive.

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Plant bulbs and corms now for springtime delight

Plant bulbs and corms now for springtime delightWhile there is plenty of gardening season left, this is the time to start planting fall-planted bulbs and corms. They are planted in the fall because an extended period of cold temperatures is necessary for the plant to begin the flowering process. Additionally, when planted in September and October, there is time to establish root systems before cold weather sets in.What is the difference between bulbs and corms?Sometimes the term bulbs is used generically used to refer to plants that have fleshy underground storage structures. True bulbs are those that have a basal plate (where plant grows from) on the bottom. There are two types of true bulbs: tunicate and imbricate. Tunicate bulbs have a paper-like covering that protect the structure from drying out. Imbricate bulbs do not have a covering and must remain moist until planting.When cut in half, true bulbs have rings (like onions). Tulip, daffodil, and hyacinth are all examples of true bulbs. Corms are modified stem bases that into a mass of energy/food storage. When corms are cut in half there will not be layers. Examples include crocuses. Other types of underground, fleshy structures include rhizomes and tubers.Flowering period of fall-planted bulbs is somewhat weather dependent and is dived into three general time frames early, middle and late, beginning in February and lasting through June. Within some genera such as Tulipa bloom times are divided further into early-, mid-. and late- within the time that Tulipa generally blooms. However, depending on the weather the flowering period within genera can be compressed into a couple of weeks rather that over six to eight weeks.When can blooms be expected? Snowdrops and crocuses lead the way in Northeast Ohio and generally bloom before others, sometimes as early as early as mid-winter. It is always a welcome treat seeing snowdrops in the landscape because it means spring is not far behind.Tulips, daffodils, hyacinths are usually seen next. Unfortunately, variable spring weather can play havoc on these plants. Warm days can trigger early flowering and an unexpected freeze will damage the blooms. Tulips are a favored deer treat but daffodils are generally unaffected.Irises, which grow from rhizomes, not bulbs or corms, and alliums are usually safe from late frost and finish flowering about the same time other plants begin to flower in the landscape.Where and how should fall-planted bulbs and corm be planted?Bulbs should be planted in an area with well-draining soil. Many types, particularly daffodils, will naturalize and multiply with very little effort.Space the bulbs according to the directions that are listed on the package and plant to the depths of two to three times the height of the bulb.A sprinkling of P fertilizer can be added when planting if a soil test indicates it is needed. Water in once planted. Covering the area with a thin layer of mulch can be helpful to protect from cold and prevent winter heaving but remove the mulch early in the late winter/early spring.Most fall-planted bulbs and corms grow well in either sun or…

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