A Guide to the Differences Between the Spanish Verbs Ser and Estar



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To be or to be. That is the question. In this post, we explain the difference between the two Spanish verbs for “to be” – Ser vs Estar. People get confused by these a lot, and there’s really no reason to be.


Let’s get right to it.

What is the difference between Ser and Estar?

There are two verbs that mean “to be” in Spanish, ser and estar.

  • Ser is used in a simple way, to talk about WHAT something is (permanent state). To describe characteristics that are an essential part of the thing we’re talking about.
  • Estar is used to talk about HOW something is, so we use it for conditions, locations, emotions, and actions (temporary states).

Recommended: How to Learn Spanish Fast in 2022

What is the difference between ser and estar?

In a little more detail…

Uses of Ser

More specifically, Ser is used for these situations:

  1. The hour, day, and date.
  2. Place of origin.
  3. Occupation.
  4. Nationality.
  5. Religious or political affiliation.
  6. The material something is made of.
  7. Possession.
  8. Relationship of one person to another.
  9. Where an event is taking place.
  10. Essential qualities (what makes this thing, this thing?).

Uses of Estar

On the other hand, Estar is used for:

  1. Geographic or physical location.
  2. State or condition (like emotions).
  3. Many idiomatic expressions.
  4. Progressive tenses (-ing).

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Ser vs Estar: A Mountain of Examples

Ultimately, the best way to understand the difference between Ser and Estar is to see a TON of example situations and which verb to use.

So we present to you just that: a mountain of detailed examples.

Situation 1: Talking about a person

SER
María is a happy person.
María es una persona muy alegre.

Being happy is a part of María’s personality, so it’s a constant, is part of WHAT María is, so we use ser.

ESTAR
María is in a good mood.
María está de buen humor.

One’s mood always changes throughout the day, and we experience different emotions in one day, so, we use Estar because we are talking about a condition.

Situation 2: Talking about the location of an event

SER
The soccer game is in the Stadium.
El juego de fútbol es en el estadio.

Here we are referring to where the event is taking place.

ESTAR
The Stadium is downtown.
El estadio está en el centro de la ciudad.

Here we are referring to the physical location of the stadium (which sounds permanent, but we use Estar for locations).

Situation 3: Describing a relationship between two people

SER
Carlos and Gabriela are spouses.
Carlos y Gabriela son esposos.

In this case, we are describing their relationship to each other.

ESTAR
Carlos and Gabriela are married.
Carlos y Gabriela están casados.

Here, we talk about their marital status, which is a condition or a state.

Situation 4: Describing appearance

SER
She is very pretty.
Ella es muy bonita.

I am giving the subject a permanent characteristic.

ESTAR
She is very beautiful tonight.
Ella está muy hermosa esta noche.

I am giving the subject a non-permanent characteristic. Maybe she’s not usually this pretty 🙁

Situation 5: Location

SER
We are from NYC.
Nosotros somos de NYC.

I am giving the subject an origin (permanent).

ESTAR
We are on a journey to Australia.
Nosotros estamos en un viaje por Australia.

I am giving the subject a current location (non permanent).

Situation 6: Marital status

SER
She is a mother.
Ella es una madre.

I am giving the subject a permanent characteristic.

ESTAR
She is married.
Ella está casada.

I am giving the subject a non permanent characteristic (hopefully it is though!).

Situation 7: Talking about fruits

SER
The apple is green. (color of the fruit)
La manzana es verde.

Here we give a characteristic of the fruit. It’s not green just for a moment, that’s part of what it is.

ESTAR
The apple is green. (it’s not ripe)
La manzana está verde.

The apple is only temporarily green in this case, because it’s not ripe.

Situation 8: Locality and nationality

SER
I am from Colombia.
Yo soy de Colombia.

We are talking about a characteristic, where I am from. The country or nationality.

ESTAR
I am in Spain.
Yo estoy en España.

We are talking about a condition. I am in a place (country) at the current moment.

Situation 9: Food.

SER
The soup is tasty at that restaurant.
En ese restaurante la sopa es muy sabrosa.

We are giving a characteristic to the soup from that restaurant specifically.

ESTAR
The soup is cold.
La sopa está fría.

We are talking about the state of the soup, which in this case is cold.

Situation 10: Describing people using temperature words.

SER
She is cold. (Her personality)
Ella es fría.

In this case when you use the verb SER and the adjective COLD the sentence takes a figurative connotation meaning that she has a cold personality, without feelings.

ESTAR
She is cold. (Her body temperature)
Ella está fría.

In this case when you use verb ESTAR and the adjective COLD the sentence takes the literal meaning of the word cold related to very low temperature. Her body is cold.

Situation 11: Talking about dead people.

SER
Santiago is a dead man.
Santiago es hombre muerto.

Somebody very dangerous has threatened Santiago’s life. He’s not actually dead yet but probably he will be soon. In this case you should use SER, and the complement “hombre muerto”

ESTAR
John Lennon is dead.
John Lennon está muerto.

We have learnt that SER is used for permanent situations and ESTAR for transitory situations, that is generally the rule. But rules usually have exceptions and this one of those. Being dead is a permanent state. But the right verb to use is ESTAR. You cannot say “John Lennon es muerto”

Situation 12: Talking about being young.

SER
My grandpa is young, he’s only 45.
Mi abuelo es joven, apenas tiene 45 años.

In this case you use verb SER when you want to say that the person is actually young.

ESTAR
My grandfather is young for his age.
Mi abuelo está joven para su edad.

In this case you use ESTAR when you want to say that the person looks younger than his/her age.

Situation 13: Exercises.

SER
Renata is a very athletic person.
Renata es una persona muy deportiva.

This is part of who Renata is as a person, not a temporary state, so we use SER.

ESTAR
Renata is very tired of doing exercises.
Renata está muy cansada de hacer ejercicio.

In this example we are talking about what Renata feels about what she is doing or what she was doing.

Situation 14: Talking about Paula.

SER
Paula is beautiful.
Paula es hermosa.

In this example we’re talking only about Paula’s permanent beauty.

ESTAR
Paula is beautiful today.
Paula está hermosa hoy.

In this example we talk about describing in a particular moment in Paula’s beauty.

Situation 15: Places.

SER
Edward is from Venezuela.
Edward es de Venezuela.

Edward is from Venezuela, meaning that’s a permanent part of who he is.

ESTAR
Edward is in Barcelona.
Edward está en Barcelona.

Edward is in Barcelona right now, but he won’t always be. It’s not part of him.

Situation 16: To identify a person.

SER
Who is the teacher?
¿Quién es la profesora?

We are asking about a person’s profession, when we use Ser, as it’s considered a part of who they are.

ESTAR
Where is the teacher?
¿Dónde está la profesora?

This is the standard way to ask where someone is (which is temporary).

Situation 17: Permanent or temporary states of an object.

SER
The ice is cold.
El hielo es frío.

The ice is always cold because if it weren’t cold, it wouldn’t be ice. Coldness is part of what it is.

ESTAR
The water is cold.
El agua está fría.

In the case of the water it depends if it is on the fridge or under the sun. The state can change, it is temporary.

Situation 18: To describe an object.

SER
The seatbelts are important.
Los cinturones de seguridad son importantes.

This is stating a quality of the seatbelt: that it’s important. It’s never not important, so this is a characteristic of the seatbelt and thus we use SER.

ESTAR
The seatbelts are in the car.
Los cinturones de seguridad están en el carro.

Here we’re talking about where the seatbelt is. We use ESTAR for locations.

Situation 19: Permanent state regarding a profession and a place of work.

SER
I am an astronaut.
Soy un astronauta.

We use SER for professions because they are considered a “part of” who the person is.

ESTAR
I am in space.
Estoy en el espacio.

In this case, we’re talking about where the astronaut is at that time.

Situation 20: Talking about a place or a specific characteristic.

SER
I am a sleepy person.
Yo soy una persona dormilona.

Here we are talking about a permanent characteristic of the person, so we use SER.

ESTAR
I am in bed.
Estoy en cama.

Again, locations always use SER. You’re not always in bed.

Situation 21: Using attributes or adjectives and status

SER
The apple is red.
La manzana es roja.

The adjective is used to point out a specific feature about something that makes it unique or stand out from the rest.

ESTAR
The apple is ripe.
La manzana está madura.

Here, we use the verb “estar” to indicate the status of something.

Situation 22: Permanent or temporary state of being.

SER
I am a happy person.
Yo soy una persona feliz.

This is a permanent state of being. Part of someone’s personality. It is just the way that person is most of the time.

ESTAR
I am happy.
Yo estoy feliz.

This is a specific mood for a shorter period of time. It is temporary, so the state of happiness could change anytime.

Situation 23: Watching the soccer game.

SER
This team is very good.
Este equipo es muy bueno.

We have to use this verb to explain the quality of the team in the sentence.

ESTAR
I am watching the soccer game at the stadium.
Yo estoy viendo el juego de fútbol en el estadio.

It’s referring to an action that is developing in one place, at a determined time, it’s temporary.

Situation 24: The boys are eating.

SER
It is pizza what they are having now.
Es pizza lo que ellos comen ahora.

Here we’re explaining what kind of food is it.

ESTAR
They are having pizza in the park.
Ellos están comiendo pizza en el parque.

Here we’re explaining what they are doing. We always use ESTAR for “-ing” situations.

Situation 25: At a party.

SER
This is a retro party.
Esta fiesta es retro.

We have to use SER to describe what kind party it is.

ESTAR
This party is really fun.
Esta fiesta está realmente divertida.

We have to use ESTAR to describe the moment.

Situation 26: Talking about your mother.

SER
She is my mom.
Ella es mi madre.

Shows a mom and son or daughter relationship and this relationship won’t change in time.

ESTAR
My mom is sad.
Mi mamá está triste.

Shows the mood that the mom is right now.

Situation 27: Talking about Javier.

SER
Javier is catholic.
Javier es católico.

Shows Javier’s religious beliefs.

ESTAR
Javier is at the church.
Javier está en la iglesia.

ESTAR is for locations. I hope you’ve got this by now!

Situation 28: Colombia.

SER
Colombia is a big country.
Colombia es un país grande.

Here we are talking about an un-changing characteristic of Colombia. It’s not going to change sizes anytime soon.

ESTAR
Colombia is progressing.
Colombia está progresando.

Here we are talking about the current state of the country.

Situation 29: The restaurant.

SER
He is a waiter.
Él es mesero.

We use SER because is a characteristic of the person.

ESTAR
The waiter is writing the order.
El mesonero está escribiendo la orden.

Here we’re referring to an action in progress.

Situation 30: Talking about his girlfriend.

SER
She is a fighter.
Ella es peleona.

We use SER because is a characteristic of the person. It’s something that can’t change easily.

ESTAR
My girlfriend is fighting with me.
Mi novia está peleando conmigo.

We use ESTAR in the second sentence because the situation can change in a moment, it’s not something that will be happing forever.

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(PS, make sure to read our beginners guide to Ser vs Estar in the past tense here)

Ser vs Estar Practice Quiz

Fill the blanks using correctly SER or ESTAR according to each image:

ser.estar1 ser.estar2
1.- Antonio ___________ ingeniero. 2.- Ellos _________ en el centro comercial.
ser.estar3 ser.estar4
3.- Joaquín y Camila ________ corriendo. 4.- El edificio _________ alto.
ser.estar5 ser.estar6
5.- Brasil ________ grande. 6.- Andrés y Joana _______ novios.
ser.estar7 ser.estar8

Key

  1.  es.
  2. están.
  3. están.
  4. es.
  5. es.
  6. son.
  7. está.
  8. está.

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FAQs

What is the difference between ESTA and estoy in Spanish?

They are the Spanish equivalent of “I am” and “you are”, assuming that you mean estoy and está. Está also can mean “he, she, or it is”, so it could have multiple functions, but it cannot be used with “I”.

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How do you know when to use Eres or es?

We use ‘eres’ for ‘are’ with you in Spanish. We use ‘es’ with usted for ‘are’.

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Is Esta temporary?

The Spanish verb ser is usually used to describe traits that are permanent. On the other hand, estar is used to refer to conditions that are temporary

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How do you use ser and estar in a sentence?

Some examples of ser and estar in use Marina es alta e intelligente. (Marina is tall and intelligent.) We use ser to describe Marina because she will always be tall and her intelligence will remain the same, it is a permanent description. Los pantalones son grises y están sucios

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Why is Tengo not estoy?

You usually say tengo when you are describing yourself and you use estoy when someone asks you how are you.

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What’s the difference between Yo soy and estoy?

Soy comes from the verb ser, whilst estoy comes from estar. This may sound quite complicated, but it’s really simple! We use soy when we are talking about permanent things, things that do not change from day to day, or hour to hour.

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What is the difference between Tu estas and tu eres?

First, estas is not a verb, estás is. Secondly, eres is the ver ser, and of course, estás is the verb estar. In English there is only one verb meaning to be, but in Spanish there are two, ser and estar. In English they mean the same, but in Spanish, they do not.

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Is es formal or informal?

For the informal tú form, we need to use the suffix -es for the verbs whose infinitive forms end in ER or IR or -as for the verbs whose infinitive forms end in AR.

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What is difference between soy and estoy?

?Soy? and ?estoy? are both first-person present tense conjugations of verbs meaning ‘to be. ‘ That is to say, they both mean ‘I am. ‘ ?Soy? is used when you’re talking about permanent, unchanging or rarely changing things. ?Estoy? is used when you’re talking about things that do vary regularly.

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Why do we use ser?

We use ser to describe persons and objects, say someone’s age and express possession ? Level 2 (A1. 2 / Novice Mid 1/2) We use ser to describe objects and people, their physical appearance and their personality.

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Why is estar used?

Estar is used when you talk about temporary states ? about how something is. You can remember the uses of estar with the acronym PLACE, which stands for Position, Location, Action, Condition, and Emotion.

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What are the 6 forms of estar?

Lesson Summary

To describe how you feel or where you are, you use the present indicative forms of estar – estoy, estás, está, estamos, estáis, están.

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What is the meaning of estar?

Estar is by far one of the most common verbs in the Spanish language. It usually translates to the English verb “to be”, but there is a bit of a catch.

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Why is it lo siento and not Yo soy siento?

When you say ?I’m sorry? it’s typically lo siento unless you’re sorry for a specific thing, in which case you drop the lo. The lo is ?it? and it stands in for the noun. So if you then specify the noun, the lo becomes redundant.

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What are the 5 forms of estar?

To describe how you feel or where you are, you use the present indicative forms of estar – estoy, estás, está, estamos, estáis, están.

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Why is esta used with usted?

In the second person, it literally means “You are.” However, when coupled with the pronoun Usted, the verb Está becomes a third person singular verb that creates a sense of formality and respect between the speaker and his audience. Usted is the pronoun for ?you? in a formal context.

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Is Como se llama usted correct?

No, the correct word in Spanish is ‘How?’ , which is ‘¿Cómo?’ ‘Cómo se llama usted?’

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Is it Esta usted or estas usted?

The other is Usted. Used for occasions when you are not familiar with the person, or is someone respected, etc. Como estás is the informal version of how are you, or the tú form of saying you. Está is the formal version or the usted form of you.

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What is the difference between “es” and “está”?

What is the difference between “es” and “está”? “es” (verbo ser) is pretty much forever, part of the object. Él es ingeniero. “está” (verbo estar) is temporary. Juan está en África. El Cairo es en África. I can think of very few cases in which you have to decide which one to use: Él es enfermo de SIDA. Él está enfermo, con un resfriado. Lex Luthor es un científico loco. ¡Cómo? ¿Estás loco? La pared de la casa es roja. Mi cara está roja de la vergüenza. Jorge es calvo. ¿Viste a Jorge? Está casi completamente calvo. Marte es un planeta muy frío. El agua para cocinar ya está caliente.

Curious? Read on

Es vs Está | Spanish Vocabulary – Linguaholic

Es vs Está Okay, so I was browsing through the forum when I came across this sentence “El cuchillo está limpio”. Why is it “está” & not “es” limpio? Can “es” only be translated as “it is” and not as “is”? Or is there another reason for this? Link to comment Share on other sites i have been wondering this also! can someone please come up with help :amazed: Link to comment Share on other sites Really! No one can help me??? I’d really like to know what the difference is when using “es” vs “esta”. Or is it that there isn’t a significant difference & that’s why no one is answering my question? Any help would be greatly appreciated. Link to comment Share on other sites Okay, so I was browsing through the forum when I came across this sentence “El cuchillo está limpio”. Why is it “está” & not “es” limpio? Can “es” only be translated as “it is” and not as “is”? Or is there another reason for this?”El cuchillo esta limpio”Here “esta” is used to denote the current state of the knife. Typically used in situations where things can change.Using “es”, it can be interpreted in a way to say that the knife is clean and nothing will change.That’s my take on this. I hope this helps a little. Link to comment Share on other sites 1 month later… Usually, the good old dirty trick to know if you don’t want to memorize the list of rules that go with ser and estar is this: estar means temporary status, and ser is more of a permanent status. So if the knife “está” limpio, it is temporarily clean but can get dirty later.If ser/es was used, it would be a permanent characteristic that it would always be clean.Sucio makes a lot more sense. If you use estar to say it is dirty/sucio, it means it’s dirty but can be cleaned and fixed. If you use ser, it means it is permanently dirty and irreplaceable, kind of like if you got motor oil on a t-shirt.Hope this makes sense!  Link to comment Share on other sites 2 months later… As people are saying, the “es” forms mean something permanent whereas “estar” is temporary. So “es” is used for things like cities, buildings, personality, etc. “Estar” is used for things like cleanliness, feelings, locations of objects, etc. This is probably a very silly trick, but I think of the lengths of the words to remember their meaning, so I would think “Es is short, the time I would take to figure out the thing is also short because it never changes. Estar is longer, and the time I would have to think about the thing is longer because it’s changing and needs more thought.” It’s silly and it’s a long way to remember something, but it’s what I do. Link to comment Share on other sites Eh, this should be quite obvious for anyone studying Spanish… but oh well.  Es and está are two different things and both are valid when used in their own context.  In this case when you say ”El cuchillo está limpio” you are stating the knife is clean right now, which is ok because we are talking about an OBJECT and its current state.  ”El cuchillo es limpio” sounds so weird, and is never really used like that, but if instead of ”Cuchillo” you use ”Raúl”, then it is right to use ”es” because you are saying Raúl is a clean person. It’s also right to use ”Está” when talking about a person, because you are saying ”Raúl” is clean right now, and not talking about a positive trait. Link to comment Share on other sites 1 month later… Really this is one of the earlier things you should learn in spanish, the difference between Ser and EstarSer is used for anything permanent.  The only real exception is that it is also used for professions and jobs ( which may not be exactly permanent when you think about it). Estar is for temporary things.It is funny, because even if you use the…

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Ser vs Estar: The Only Guide You'll Ever Need | BaseLang

A Guide to the Differences Between the Spanish Verbs Ser and Estar Get our free email course, Shortcut to Conversational. Have conversations faster, understand people when they speak fast, and other tested tips to learn faster. More info To be or to be. That is the question. In this post, we explain the difference between the two Spanish verbs for “to be” – Ser vs Estar. People get confused by these a lot, and there’s really no reason to be. Let’s get right to it. What is the difference between Ser and Estar? There are two verbs that mean “to be” in Spanish, ser and estar. Ser is used in a simple way, to talk about WHAT something is (permanent state). To describe characteristics that are an essential part of the thing we’re talking about. Estar is used to talk about HOW something is, so we use it for conditions, locations, emotions, and actions (temporary states). Recommended: How to Learn Spanish Fast in 2022 In a little more detail… Uses of Ser More specifically, Ser is used for these situations: The hour, day, and date. Place of origin. Occupation. Nationality. Religious or political affiliation. The material something is made of. Possession. Relationship of one person to another. Where an event is taking place. Essential qualities (what makes this thing, this thing?). Uses of Estar On the other hand, Estar is used for: Geographic or physical location. State or condition (like emotions). Many idiomatic expressions. Progressive tenses (-ing). Unsure what to learn next? Download the exact curriculum that thousands of BaseLang students have used to become fluent in Spanish. Download Guide Now! Ser vs Estar: A Mountain of Examples Ultimately, the best way to understand the difference between Ser and Estar is to see a TON of example situations and which verb to use. So we present to you just that: a mountain of detailed examples. Situation 1: Talking about a person SER María is a happy person. María es una persona muy alegre. Being happy is a part of María’s personality, so it’s a constant, is part of WHAT María is, so we use ser. ESTAR María is in a good mood. María está de buen humor. One’s mood always changes throughout the day, and we experience different emotions in one day, so, we use Estar because we are talking about a condition. Situation 2: Talking about the location of an event SER The soccer game is in the Stadium. El juego de fútbol es en el estadio. Here we are referring to where the event is taking place. ESTAR The Stadium is downtown. El estadio está en el centro de la ciudad. Here we are referring to the physical location of the stadium (which sounds permanent, but we use Estar for locations). Situation 3: Describing a relationship between two people SER Carlos and Gabriela are spouses. Carlos y Gabriela son esposos. In this case, we are describing their relationship to each other. ESTAR Carlos and Gabriela are married. Carlos y Gabriela están casados. Here, we talk about their marital status, which is a condition or a state. Situation 4: Describing appearance SER She is very pretty. Ella es muy bonita. I am giving the subject a permanent characteristic. ESTAR She is very beautiful tonight. Ella está muy hermosa esta noche. I am giving the subject a non-permanent characteristic. Maybe she’s not usually this pretty 🙁 Situation 5: Location SER We are from NYC. Nosotros somos de NYC. I am giving the subject an origin (permanent). ESTAR We are on a journey to Australia. Nosotros estamos en un viaje por Australia. I am giving the subject a current location (non permanent). Situation 6: Marital status SER She is a mother. Ella es una madre. I am giving the subject a permanent characteristic. ESTAR She…

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Está and es – Spanish (Spain) – Memrise

Está and es

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How do you know when to use es and Esta in Spanish?

How do you know when to use es and Esta in Spanish? – AnswersToAll 3 Answers vote. Está is the third person singular of the verb Estar, and es is the third person singular of the verb ser. votes. So in a sentence…when you are trying to write a sentence and you want to write “is” when would you put “es” and when would you put “está”? votes. You will also see esta, without the accent. How do you use Esta es in Spanish? esta = this. está = he/she/it is. Está is from the verb estar, es is from the verb ser. Esta just means this (singular feminine). está = he/she/it is. esta es = this is. What is the difference between es feliz and Esta Feliz? Ser feliz means that the person is always happy whereas estar feliz means the person is happy today. Does esta have an accent in Spanish? (This one is yours.), we don’t need an accent to know that esta is a pronoun. We know it’s a pronoun because it has taken the place of the noun it refers to (camisa). Is Es or estar permanent? The Spanish verb ser is usually used to describe traits that are permanent. On the other hand, estar is used to refer to conditions that are temporary. As you go through this guide, think of the way in which the uses of ser are permanent and the uses of estar are temporary. Is Feliz Esty or soy? When would you say one or the other, or are they interchangeble. I hear “soy feliz” in many songs. But… in the Spanish Lessons 1.1 – Greetings and Introductions, “Estoy feliz” is used for when someone asks you how you’re doing. When to use “ESTA” vs “es”? Both “es” and “está” both translate to “is”…so it can be tricky deciding which word to use. Use “es” (from the verb ser) when referring to something more permanent , like a physical or personality characteristic. Use “está” (from the verb estar) when referring to something more temporary, like an emotion, location, or condition. When do you use ESTA in Spanish? Está is used when the subject of the verb is singular. (one item [book] or he/she/it/you) Están is used when the subject of the verb is plural (more than one item [books] or they/you all) What does “Este” in Spanish mean? Este is the masculine form meaning “this”. It’s also the word meaning “east”. There is no word estan as far as I know, but there is a word “están”, which is a form of the verb estar, this time in 3rd person plural, meaning “they are”. What does Esta es mean? esta. cbp .dhs.gov. The Electronic System for Travel Authorization (ESTA) is an automated system that determines the eligibility of visitors to travel to the United States under the Visa Waiver Program (VWP).

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Difference between hay and está in Spanish

Difference between hay and está in SpanishThere is often confusion for English speakers when using hay and está.  Let’s see the difference: The Spanish “hay” Hay means “There is/there are”. We use hay when we are talking or asking about the existence of something/someone. Generally the order can present itself in two ways, here’s the first: Verb (Hay) + indefinite article (un/una) + noun + [somewhere] For example: Hay una farmacia en mi barrio.There is a chemist in my neighbourhood. Here’s the second way: [Somewhere] + verb (hay) + indefinite article (un/una) + noun  For example: En mi barrio hay una farmacia.In my neighbourhood there is a chemist. You can use the plural definite articles unos/unas but very often we omit them as they are not necessary: Hay (unos) bares en la plaza del pueblo.There are (some) bars in the village square. The Spanish “está” “Está” means “It is” and “están” means “They are”. We use estar to locate things/people somewhere. The general order of the sentences with estar is:  Definite article (el, la, los, las) +noun + verb (está/están) + somewhere  For example: El parque está en la parte norte de la ciudad.The park is in the north part of the city. La iglesia está al lado del colegio.The church is next to the school. El bar de Miguel está en la esquina.Miguel’s bar is on the corner. Have a look at how we would use both hay and está in a simple conversation: ¿Hay un parque por aquí?Is there a park over here? Sí, hay un parque cerca.Yes, there is a park nearby. Someone is asking about the existence of a park nearby. Notice how after hay we use the indefinite article “un” (the same way in English the indefinite article “a” is used) Once the speaker knows there is one, he/she asks where it is: ¿Dónde está el parque?Where is the park? El parque está allí a la derecha.The park is there on the right. Notice how now they are using “está” to locate it. Now they don’t use the indefinite article “un/una” but the definite article “el/la” (the same way in English “the” is used) Be careful when using “dónde hay…” instead of “dónde está…” as this can be confusing. We sometimes use dónde + hay for a first question, even when we haven’t yet discovered the location, because we are assuming that the place we are asking about does exist. For example: Señora, por favor, ¿dónde hay una farmacia por aquí?Madam, please, where is there a pharmacy around here? Notice that after hay there is still the indefinite article (una). Don’t forget the accent on está/están See also: Using el or la to say “the” in Spanish (singular definite articles) Using los or las to say “the” in Spanish (plural definite articles) Using un, una to say a/an in Spanish (singular indefinite articles) Using unos, unas + plural nouns to say some / a few in Spanish (Artículo indefinido -plural) Using hay = there is / there are in Spanish Ser vs Estar in Spanish: Using estar in Spanish (not ser) when talking about locations Video You can also watch the video below with Gordon and Cynthia from Lightspeed Spanish explaining how hay and está works. Want to make sure your Spanish sounds confident? We’ll map your knowledge and give you free lessons to focus on your gaps and mistakes. Start your Braimap today »El parque está allí a la derecha.The park is there on the right.La iglesia está al lado del colegio.The church is next to the school.¿Dónde está el parque?Where is the park?¿Hay algún cine por aquí?Is there any cinema round here?Señora, por favor, ¿dónde hay una farmacia por aquí?Madam, please, where is there a pharmacy around here?Sí, hay un parque cerca.Yes, there is a park nearby.En mi barrio hay una farmacia.In my neighbourhood there is a chemist.El bar de Miguel está en la esquina.Miguel’s bar is on the corner.¿Hay un parque por aquí?Is there a park over here?Hay una farmacia en mi barrio.There is a chemist in my neighbourhood.Hay (unos) bares…

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